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Beke Hansen

’ echoes presentations of the colonized “as underdeveloped versions of Europeans and their civilization” ( Hardt & Negri 2001 , 126) in colonial discourses of the 19th century. This view is firmly grounded in the belief that the historical stages of the development of mankind are “present synchronically in

Series:

Beke Hansen

societies with an independent construal of self, it may be the unmarked case in societies with an interdependent construal of self (cf. Section 7.2). (152) We must do more for these people when these people clamor for subsidies ( ice - sin :S1B-051) (153) Sir it is my fervent belief that we must

Extremely Common Eloquence

constructing Scottish identity through narrative

Series:

Ronald K.S. Macaulay

Extremely Common Eloquence presents a detailed analysis of the narrative and rhetorical skills employed by working-class Scots in talking about important aspects of their lives. The wide range of devices employed by the speakers and the high quality of the examples provide convincing evidence to reject any possible negative evaluation of working-class speech on the basis of details of non-standard pronunciation and grammar. In addition to this display of linguistic accomplishment the examples examined show how these skills are employed to communicate important aspects of Scottish identity and culture.
Although the political status of Scotland has fluctuated over the past four hundred years, the sense of Scottish identity has remained strong. Part of that sense of identity comes from a form of speech that remains markedly distinct from that of the dominant neighbour to the south. There are cultural attitudes that indicate a spirit of independence that is consistent with this linguistic difference. The ways in which the speakers in this book express themselves reveal their beliefs in egalitarianism, independence, and the value of hard work. Extremely Common Eloquence demonstrates how the methods of linguistic analysis can be combined with an investigation into cultural values.

Series:

Marie Nedregotten Sørbø

example in this chapter turns Austen’s meaning upside down. When Darcy thinks that his mistake has been to be honest about his scruples, he says that he should have “with greater policy concealed my struggles, and flattered you into the belief of my being impelled by unqualified, unalloyed inclination; by

Series:

Marie Nedregotten Sørbø

example in this chapter turns Austen’s meaning upside down. When Darcy thinks that his mistake has been to be honest about his scruples, he says that he should have “with greater policy concealed my struggles, and flattered you into the belief of my being impelled by unqualified, unalloyed inclination; by

Series:

Marie Nedregotten Sørbø

). 61 Similarly, “both equally big” is the opposite of “by no means of equal magnitude” (196). Likewise, “a reason … which asked no extraordinary stretch of belief” (326) is the opposite of “the motive did not appear creditable”. 62 Furthermore, to let Elizabeth ask Mr Darcy about Colonel Fitzwilliam

Series:

Marie Nedregotten Sørbø

). 61 Similarly, “both equally big” is the opposite of “by no means of equal magnitude” (196). Likewise, “a reason … which asked no extraordinary stretch of belief” (326) is the opposite of “the motive did not appear creditable”. 62 Furthermore, to let Elizabeth ask Mr Darcy about Colonel Fitzwilliam

Series:

Beke Hansen

Th. Pratt, The Tormented Fawcett Public , 36. 35 The oed online version 2015 gives an earlier attestation from the New York Times from 1961: My belief in The Times’ infallibility … was finally toppled by your endorsement of Mayor Wagner in the Democratic primary. You just have to be joking . It

“Einen Newen Reformatorem

Die Reformationsschauspiele von Martin Rinckart und die Reformpoetik von Martin Opitz

Dirk Rose

The essay focuses on the drama-pieces planned by Martin Rinckart to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the Reformation in 1617. They are concentrated around Martin Luther as a “hero” for the protestant confession, like in Der Eißlebische Christliche Ritter where Luther figures as a warrior of true belief. Special attention is paid first to the relation between text and music with regard to the performances of the pieces; and second to the question why Rinckart has obviously realized only three of the seven planned pieces about the reformation and Luther. For answering, the essay argues that the reform in poetics and poetry initiated by Martin Opitz has challenged the poetical concept of Rinckart’s pieces in such a way that he was unable to continue them. Ironically, his most famous religious poem Nun danket alle Gott has been rescued out of the wreckage of his ambitious plan of a Luther-Heptalogy.

Wallensteins Tod in der Geschichtsschreibung

Die frühen Flugschriften und Schillers Geschichte des dreyßigjährigen Kriegs

Florian Krobb

This article investigates how contemporary news media, pamphlets and (slightly later) some more elaborate justificatory accounts of the events treated the death of Imperial Commander-in-Chief Wallenstein. The analysis of strategies of emplotment, structure and rhetorical devices of the relevant texts reveal how they all, regardless of the text’s position on either side of the religious and political divide, affirm the power of ‘history’ (fate, providence) to re-establish a balance that had previously been disturbed. A parallel analysis of Friedrich Schiller’s groundbreaking account of the Thirty Years War reveals how, 150 years later, the belief in the self-healing powers of history, the capacity of achieving its own equilibrium, still dominates his philosophy of history.