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Series:

Stefanie Schnitzer Mills

Introduction The concept of Evil is something that rings familiar with virtually every culture across time and space. It seems to be a belief that is shared with some of our earliest ancestors – the idea of something so far removed from what we perceive as right and acceptable that simple terms

Series:

Zachary J. Goldberg

inevitably be a good life. Despite significant differences among their philosophies, they each posited a rational universe that rewards moral merit with happiness. Whereas Kantian ethics and utilitarianism do not require belief in a rational and moral universe, each theory implicitly rests on the mistaken

Series:

Edited by Rallie Murray and Stefanie Schnitzer

Our world has become inundated with images of a reality in which ‘evil’ thrives, and ‘good’ seems to be a naïve, utopian fantasy. ‘Good’ is reserved for superheroes and children’s stories, while the ‘real world’ is driven by greed, violence, and hatred. If we are so consumed with evil, then is there any point to writing about it? Perhaps the more important question is ‘why should we ever stop writing about it?’. Towards that end, this volume is intended to act as a catalyst to an ongoing destabilization of mental (philosophical) and social (political, historical) regimes of ‘evil’ in thought and practice. It is compiled with the intention of saying something new about a very old topic, as a reminder that this is an unfinished conversation which stretches back millennia and has a deeply tangible impact on the worlds within which we live today. Contributors are Peter Brian Barry, Lima Bhuiyan, Diedra L. Clay, Zachary J. Goldberg, Sophia Kanaouti, Stefanie Schnitzer Mills, Rallie Murray, Asli Tekinay and Claudio Vescia Zanini.

Series:

Rallie Murray

from in our world? Is it simply ‘there’, a condition of reality that may be deployed against us by interested forces? This perception certainly has precedent, indeed, as Stefanie Schnitzer Mills demonstrates in her chapter ‘The Belief in Evil and Its Redefinition during the Salem Witch Trials’, the

Series:

Peter Brian Barry

essential to agency and intentional action. If there is going to be any real controversy about the possibility of diabolical action—and there is—then diabolical actions must be performed absent any belief that so acting is good in any interesting respect. And the most compelling reason to be sceptical

Series:

Lima Bhuiyan

him as an exceptional case? 18 This belief in exceptionalism is the new American psyche. After the shift in 9/11, a zealous rise of patriotism began, a tide yet to subside. The American flag was raised, tattooed, given away at sporting events and prominently displayed as the new symbol of unity as if

Series:

Claudio Vescia Zanini

that something has happened: the claim that documentary can present a truthful and accurate portrayal of the social world is not only validated through the association of the camera with the instruments of science but also depends upon the cultural belief that the camera does not lie. 18 Like other

Series:

Rallie Murray

‘banality of evil’ marked a revision of her previous understanding of ‘radical evil,’ the wilful belief that humans are superfluous and expendable. Banality, on the other hand, Arendt saw as emergent from within totalitarian regimes which produced individuals ‘unable to think for themselves and to