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Christina Cavedon

In Cultural Melancholia: US Trauma Discourses Before and After 9/11, Christina Cavedon frames her examination of 9/11 fiction, especially Jay McInerney’s The Good Life and Don DeLillo’s Falling Man, with a thorough discussion of what US reactions to the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 disclose about American culture. Offering a comparative reading of pre- and post-9/11 literary, public, and academic discourses, she deconstructs the still commonly held belief that cultural repercussions of the attacks primarily testify to a cultural trauma in the wake of the collectively witnessed media event. She innovatively re-interprets discourses to be symptomatic of a malaise which had afflicted American culture already prior to 9/11 and can best be approached with melancholia as an analytical concept.

"After thirty Falls"

New Essays on John Berryman

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Edited by Nils Philip Coleman and Philip McGowan

Prefaced by an account of the early days of Berryman studies by bibliographer and scholar Richard J. Kelly, “ After thirty Falls” is the first collection of essays to be published on the American poet John Berryman (1914-1972) in over a decade. The book seeks to provoke new interest in this important figure with a group of original essays and appraisals by scholars from Ireland, the United Kingdom, Hong Kong, and the United States. Exploring such areas as the poet’s engagements with Shakespeare and the American sonnet tradition, his use of the Trickster figure and the idea of performance in his poetics, it expands the interpretive framework by which Berryman may be evaluated and studied, and it will be of interest to students of modern American poetry at all levels. What makes the collection particularly valuable is its inclusion of previously unpublished material – including a translation of a poem by Catullus and excerpts from the poet’s detailed notes on the life of Christ – thereby providing new contexts for future assessments of Berryman’s contribution to the development of poetry, poetics, and the relationship between scholarship and other forms of writing in the twentieth century.

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Patrick Shade

alternatives. Expecting recovery when the body or spirit is no longer able typically results in frustration and despondency. Caregivers and cared-fors alike may interpret the loss of capacities as an inevitable slide toward incompetence. This belief can be propped up dangerously with the simplistic view that

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Carlos Pereda

Translator Sean Manning

many of our behaviors and predicts a certain history. This is because each place is much more than a corporeal or geographical piece of information. It is fashioned from a complexity of desires, a tradition of beliefs and expectations, the dialects of allusions in a language, one or more religions

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Carlos Pereda

Translator Sean Manning

America’s Southern Cone exile. In those readings, we rediscover types of experiences (at least, this is what I am proposing) that have already been seen in Antiquity in some way or another, and that, as the chapter titles indicate, can be reconstructed through the beliefs, emotions and hopes of those

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Matthew Caleb Flamm

. For the most part, if a contemporary philosopher’s account of happiness is to be taken seriously, it must in some manner weigh in on starchy, theoretically fraught, circumspect questions like: Is it one’s duty to be happy? How does one assess the moral worth of one’s actions and beliefs? Where one

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Mariangela Palladino

reassembled, in order to utter itself, the total body must revert to the dust of words, to the listings of details, to a monotonous inventory of parts, to crumbling: language undoes the body, returns to its fetish. This return is coded under the term blazon …. As a genre, the blazon expresses the belief

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Kerstin Schmidt

The belief in the documentary veracity of photographs has been viewed in critical light from the beginnings of photography. At the same time, it has remained a powerful construct, as the ongoing trust in the power of photographs to serve as proof and authentic documentation demonstrates

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Joseph Imorde

need to continuously narrate it anew. The unfolding of the potential narratives does, however, require people to lend their affection to the exhibition of objects and pictures. While some of the re-collectables in our Canadian household show remnants of political convictions and religious beliefs, or

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Marta Duńko-Kałużyńska

Pinsker’s words, “[f]reedom is America’s abiding subject, as well as its deepest problem” (67); thus, by presenting a protagonist’s loyalties as divided between his conscience and the commandments of society, what Twain also questions is Emersonian idealism—the belief that one can remain resistant to