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Montserrat González

In the production of a target text, the translator takes into consideration not only equivalence but also contextual information about the communicative event and the participants’ intentions, beliefs and actions. Pragmatic markers are linguistic oral cues that bring contextual information to the text, frame the sequence of events and provide the utterance with the necessary illocutionary force. Although empty of propositional meaning, they do have important procedural meaning, as key linguistic pieces that facilitate the interpretive processes. The aim of this contribution is to discuss the role that markers play in the translator’s task of producing a target text, focusing on the cross-linguistic functional equivalences and interpretive resemblance between what is encoded and what is communicated. The discussion is exemplified with instances taken from The Talented Mr Ripley by Patricia Highsmith (1955) and from the Spanish translation A pleno sol (El talento de Ripley) by Jordi Beltrán (1981).

Translation Practices

Through Language to Culture

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Edited by Ashley Chantler and Carla Dente

This cutting-edge collection, born of a belief in the value of approaching ‘translation’ in a wide range of ways, contains essays of interest to students and scholars of translation, literary and textual studies. It provides insights into the relations between translation and comparative literature, contrastive linguistics, cultural studies, painting and other media.
Subjects and authors discussed include: the translator as ‘go-between’; the textual editor as translator; Ghirri’s photography and Celati’s fiction; the European lending library; La Bible d’Amiens; the coining of Italian phraseological units; Michèle Roberts’s Impossible Saints; the impact of modern translations for stage on perceptions of ancient Greek drama; and the translation of slang, intensifiers, characterisation, desire, the self, and America in 1990s Italian fiction.
The collection closes with David Platzer’s discussion of translating Dacia Maraini’s poetry into English and with his new translations of ‘Ho Sognato una Stazione’ (‘I Dreamed of a Station’) and ‘Le Tue Bugie’ (‘Your Lies’).

Natural Language and Possible Minds

How Language Uncovers the Cognitive Landscape of Nature

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Prakash Mondal

In Natural Language and Possible Minds: How Language Uncovers the Cognitive Landscape of Nature Prakash Mondal attempts to demonstrate that language can reveal the hidden logical texture of diverse types of mentality in non-humans, contrary to popular belief. The widely held assumption in mainstream cognitive science is that language being humanly unique introduces an anthropomorphic bias in investigations into the nature of other possible minds. This book turns this around by formulating a lattice of mental structures distilled from linguistic structures constituting the cognitive building blocks of an ensemble of biological entities/beings. This turns out to have surprising consequences for machine cognition as well. Challenging mainstream views, this book will appeal to cognitive scientists, philosophers of mind, linguists and also cognitive ethologists.

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Maïté Dupont

.50) ranked the second lowest. ( LOCRA ). 35 Morality expresses the most fundamental beliefs, but does not necessarily provide a means for resolving practical dilemmas. Ethics, on the other hand , does not only relate to beliefs but also to the way people determine how to act in practice ( LOCRA ). 36 The

Series:

John M. Kirk

addressed by the moderator. 1 a. ⟨ I ⟩ 3 ⟨$ A ⟩ ⟨#⟩ ⟨rep⟩ Well there are few subjects more emotive than fair employment and our panel tonight are passionate in their beliefs ⟨,⟩ both for and against ⟨/rep⟩ ( ICE - NI - P 1 B -024) 4 Moreover, well may introduce to the audience the broadcast

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Karin Aijmer

intersubjective functions. In this perspective, intensifiers are viewed as resources which “negotiate relationships of alignment/disalignment vis-à-vis the various value positions referenced by the text and hence vis-à-vis the socially-constituted communities of shared attitudes and beliefs associated with those

Extremely Common Eloquence

constructing Scottish identity through narrative

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Ronald K.S. Macaulay

Extremely Common Eloquence presents a detailed analysis of the narrative and rhetorical skills employed by working-class Scots in talking about important aspects of their lives. The wide range of devices employed by the speakers and the high quality of the examples provide convincing evidence to reject any possible negative evaluation of working-class speech on the basis of details of non-standard pronunciation and grammar. In addition to this display of linguistic accomplishment the examples examined show how these skills are employed to communicate important aspects of Scottish identity and culture.
Although the political status of Scotland has fluctuated over the past four hundred years, the sense of Scottish identity has remained strong. Part of that sense of identity comes from a form of speech that remains markedly distinct from that of the dominant neighbour to the south. There are cultural attitudes that indicate a spirit of independence that is consistent with this linguistic difference. The ways in which the speakers in this book express themselves reveal their beliefs in egalitarianism, independence, and the value of hard work. Extremely Common Eloquence demonstrates how the methods of linguistic analysis can be combined with an investigation into cultural values.

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Kwasi Wiredu

empiricalness of the propositions concerned. To illustrate: the conception of a person entertained by many African peoples, certainly by the Akans Akan belief system , has two aspects: one descriptive, the other normative. Descriptively, a person is held to consist of a bodily frame ( Nipadua ) and a life

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Prakash Mondal

cognitive processes are marked by the capability of organisms or creatures to do things for reasons that can be aligned with having beliefs, goals, desires or intentions. Having reasons for doing something for them does not arise from evolutionary trajectories of the creatures that possess cognitive

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Rosa M. Calcaterra

belief.’ The term ‘sentence,’ used by philosophers in the Fregean tradition, lacks this ambiguity. Once the philosophy of language was freed from what Quine and Davidson call “the dogmas of empiricism” […] sentences were no longer thought of as expressions of experience nor as representations of extra