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In: The ‘Air of Liberty’
Michelle Cliff, David Dabydeen, Opal Palmer Adisa
The two volumes on Postcolonialism and Autobiography examine the affinity of postcolonial writing to the genre of autobiography. The contributions of specialists from Northern Africa, Europe and the United States focus on two areas in which the interrelation of postcolonialism and autobiography is very prominent and fertile: the Maghreb and the Anglophone and Francophone Caribbean. The colonial background of these regions provides the stimulus for writers to launch a program for emancipation in an effort to constitute a decolonized subject in autobiographical practice. While the French volume addresses issues of the autobiographical genre in the postcolonial conditions of the Maghreb and the Caribbean with reference to France, the English volume analyzes the autobiographical writings of David Dabydeen (Guyana), Michelle Cliff, Opal Palmer Adisa, George Lamming, Wilson Harris (Jamaica), and Jamaica Kincaid (Antigua) who have maintained their cultural Caribbean origin while living in England or the United States. Critics such as William Boelhower, Leigh Gilmore, Sidonie Smith, and Gayatri Spivak reveal the many layers of different cultures (Indian, African, European, American) that are covered over by the colonial powers. The homeland, exile, the experience of migration and hybridity condition the postcolonial existence of writers and critics. The incorporation of excerpts from the writers' works is meant to show the great variety and riches of a hybrid imagination and to engage in an interactive dialogue with critics.
Narratives of the South Atlantic Past
The Caribbean imagination as framed within a Dutch historical setting has deep Portuguese-African roots. The Seven Provinces were the first European power, in the first half of the 17th century, to challenge the Iberian countries directly for a share in the slave trade. This book analyzes the philosophy underlying this transoceanic link, when contacts with Africa started to be developed.
The ambiguous morality of the ‘air of liberty’ governing the Afro-Portuguese past had its impact on the creole cultures (white, black, Jewish) of the Dutch territories of Suriname and Curaçao. Although this influence is gradually disappearing, it is astonishing to witness the engagement with which writers and visual artists have interpreted this heritage in their different ways. Recent narratives from Angola and Brazil offer an appropriate starting-point for an examination of strategies of self-representation and national consolidation in works by authors from the Dutch Caribbean. In order to reveal this complex historical pattern, the (formerly) Dutch-related port communities are conceived of as cultural agents whose ‘lettered cities’ (Ángel Rama) have engaged in critical dialogue with the heritage of the South Atlantic trade in human lives.
Artists and writers discussed include (colonial period): Caspar Barlaeus, David Nassy, Frans Post, and John Gabriel Stedman; (modern period): Frank Martinus Arion, Cola Debrot, Gabriel García Márquez, Albert Helman, Francisco Herrera Luque, Boeli van Leeuwen, Tip Marugg, Alberto Mussa, Pepetela, Julio Perrenal, and Mário Pinto de Andrade.

explicitly cite the pirates’ rules, but the story Cleveland tells Minna indicates that both his election as captain and his marooning were the result of such principles. In Treasure Island , in comparison, the possibility to depose the captain occupies a central place in the narrative. Stevenson further

In: Postmodern Pirates

never really work out as planned, and he persistently ends up as a prisoner, locked in a cell or the brig of a ship, marooned on a lonely island, or on the gallows. James Berardinelli therefore argues that “Cap’n Jack Sparrow (Johnny Depp) is a pirate who’s infamous for his ineptitude” (Rev. of PotC

In: Postmodern Pirates

increase when he believes to have caused the death of Francisco, the son of his wife, as well. When he discovers that Francisco has survived having been marooned by the first mate, Cain is overjoyed, and this event marks the turning point in his career. Remarkably, exactly at the moment of his

In: Postmodern Pirates

Barbossa’s little monkey stealing one of the cursed coins and thus highlights that the supernatural has not been safely banned. The fourth instalment suggests that the marooned Angelica might have the knowledge to use the voodoo puppet of Jack to take revenge on him. The post-credit scene of the fifth

In: Postmodern Pirates