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Series:

Michael Bath

establish a context for its usage in England which surely clarifies Gowrie’s likely motives for including a version of it in the decoration of his house in late-sixteenth century Scotland, for that context was precisely parallel to the contested arguments between Catholic and Protestant campaigners that

Series:

Olaf Blaschke

Abstract

Anti-Catholicism and anti-clericalism loom large in historical scholarship nowadays because these issues illustrate the functional patterns of bourgeois society and its tendency of secularisation. It would be a misunderstanding, however, to see Catholics only as victims. Among them anti-Protestant intolerance and resentments were as rampant as were anti-Catholic stereotypes among non-Catholics. What were the differences between anti-Catholicism and anti-Protestantism? Why has the narrative of anti-Protestantism not been told yet?

Series:

Ulrike Gleixner

Abstract

The entrance of Protestantism into the non-European mission is closely connected with Pietism, as the Pietistic concept of conversion shows a clear expansive dimension. In 1701 the Halle activist and theologian August Hermann Francke published his vision of a Protestant world mission. This idea of conversion was rooted in a millenarian idea of future, in which the kingdom of God would spread gradually. In the eyes of the Pietists the Danish-Halle mission in South-East India was a key component to the Protestant kingdom of God. The activists of the Halle orphanage published not only a promotional mission journal, but also built a network of hundreds of supporters from the elite of society, which financed the realization of this project. The shared vision was a Protestant Empire. The activities of the mission network effected social and spatial changes in Europe and India.

Series:

Laura M. Stevens

Abstract

This paper examines a centerpiece of anti-Catholic rhetoric, the Whore of Babylon, in Britain from 1660 to 1789. It argues that during this era the Whore came to stand less for the Roman Catholic Church and more for Protestants’ own tendencies to drift towards beliefs and practices that resembled Catholicism, especially through an emphasis on external display over spiritual substance. In such writings ‘whorishness’ suggests a relationship with God that is mediated by elements marked as false including set prayer, priestly vestments, or a belief in salvation through works. There was a double valence to the usage of the Whore, however, for it is also the case that, within moderate circles, to make use of this figure of Babylon also suggested an extremism that in its fanaticism resembled Catholicism. Treatments of the Whore in this place and time thus were governed by a duality that positioned her beyond the pale of legitimate religious debate. Held up as a lens onto a monstrous Catholicism, she also blurred the line between Catholic and Protestant, revealing anti-Protestant qualities in those most eager to defeat her.

Series:

Dominic Bryan

Abstract

This article explores the influence the Irish border has had on the cultural expression of Orangeism north and south of the border. Utilising anthropological understandings of culture the article looks at the Orange Institution as a transnational organisation. It focuses on the contrasting problems created for a pro-British, pro-Empire Protestant organisation once the Grand Lodge of Ireland found itself with jurisdiction over Orange lodges and parades in two politically antagonistic countries. The symbols used in the parades on both sides of the border reveal the divergent relations of power within which the Orange Order has developed. The Orange Order in the Republic of Ireland has adapted the ideological content of their parades to allow them to hold regular events in County Donegal. However, the Grand Orange Lodge of Ireland effectively acts as if it is the Grand Lodge of Northern Ireland. Equally, the Irish state has struggled to know how to deal with Orange parades within the Republic. In its conclusions, this article suggests that studying culture allows us to map aspects of transnationalism by exploring both the effects that common cultural traits have on border regions and the effects that the border and changed power relations have on culture.

Series:

Alexander J. Fisher

, viscount of Turenne, were devastating the Franconian countryside and nearing the city of Nuremberg. As the Protestant troops established their camp outside the city at the end of October, Nuremberg’s most prominent poet, Georg Philipp Harsdörffer, raced to compose a song of praise, a Lobgesang , in honour

Sinead Mooney

Edited by Marius Buning, Matthijs Engelberts, Onno Kosters, Mary Bryden, Lance St John Butler and Peter Boxall