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Author: Maki Kaneko

away from a life of idiocy as my destiny and responsibility as a living [human], or for the sake of fulfi lling my days. 61 Murai draws our attention to the fact that, while declaring his sanity explicitly, Matsumoto gives symbolic meaning to a line. In another essay writ- ten at about the same

In: Mirroring the Japanese Empire
Author: Maki Kaneko

, motivated me to work on the topic of war, representation, and the male fi gure. A number of museums allowed me access to their collections and materials. Reita Hirase of Himeji City Museum of Art, Ikuma Hirota of Kōbe City Museum, Yoshiya Hashimoto of Setagaya Art Museum, and Tsutomu Mizusawa of the

In: Mirroring the Japanese Empire

sexual freedom of a longed- for original condition” incorporated both chrono- logically and geographically remote sources in the hope of fi nding alternative modes of living, com- municating, and practicing creativity—a phenome- non usually referred to in art as primitivism.2 However, attempting to

In: Bokujinkai: Japanese Calligraphy and the Postwar Avant-Garde
Author: Erin Schoneveld

- ulation of personality as the artist’s “life force” (seimeikan), claiming that “the stroke of the artist’s brush is like an extension of his nervous system . . . every stroke represents the artist . . . [for Cézanne] it is a matter of rhythm when creating art.”19 Yamawaki felt that “personality” was

In: Shirakaba and Japanese Modernism
Author: Erin Schoneveld

a legacy.1 This re- positioning was likewise refl ected in the content of the Shirakaba magazine, which, while continuing to concentrate on the status and the life of the artist, began to place more emphasis on “educating” the Japanese public about Western art. The magazine’s shifting focus was

In: Shirakaba and Japanese Modernism
Author: Erin Schoneveld

will be open to the public and anyone who donated more than 1 yen will be considered a life-long member of the museum.61 By motivating the Japanese public to buy into the “exclusive” group of art patrons, the Shirakaba group hoped to galvanize popular support that went beyond their own artistic

In: Shirakaba and Japanese Modernism
Author: Erin Schoneveld

Japanese public. At its height of popularity it was estimated that one in every ten people living in the Tokyo metropolitan area had visited a Bunten exhibition.11 This positive public response was re- fl ected in many newspaper and magazine articles, as in one reviewer’s remarks in Bijutsu shinpō (Art

In: Shirakaba and Japanese Modernism
Author: Erin Schoneveld

through living life to the fullest extent despite per- sonal hardship and adversity.68 His impression of Van Gogh, at least theoretically, was as an artist who, “only painted what was concrete and true to the Self.”69 For Kishida this represented a purely subjective and profoundly personal expression

In: Shirakaba and Japanese Modernism

ambassador […] a man whose obvious goal in life was to assemble this incomparable artistic estate and donate it to his Greek homeland in the sunset of his life. Honor and glory to the dynamic senior… honor and glory, we repeat, to the altruist senior, whom the country of Corfu will rank among its

In: Journal of Japonisme

-object-idea ‘assemblages’; or producing simple allegories of commodity fetishism, status, and alienation; or falling back on a form of secular animism where things have ‘a social life’ of their own. These recurring paradigms may be effective rhetorically because they employ a heuristic whereby the objects under our noses

In: Conceptualism and Materiality