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with the depiction of one’s own life is as old as literature itself and was already consciously used in the Middle Ages. 1 In France especially, the ‘autobiography in the form of a novel’ has remained a decisive trend in the literary world up until today, although certain dissenting voices who favour

In: Taking Stock – Twenty-Five Years of Comparative Literary Research
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city as a place ‘for a living out of counter-normative, creative identities.’ 18 Maurice Blanchot, for example, thought of Berlin as ‘not only Berlin, but also the symbol of the division of the world, and even more: a ‘point in the universe’, the place where reflection on the both necessary and

In: Taking Stock – Twenty-Five Years of Comparative Literary Research
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within culture and by political forces. The conceit here is unexpected: this is a descent from an idea of God to an idea of ordinary life. It occurs when God’s once-dominant aides are seen to return (in the five aphoristic sentences) as individuals who now abandon being ‘rank toadies of the Almighty

In: Aphoristic Modernity
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care seems to have been an early impulse and motivation, which led Hughes from wildlife-watching to poetry-writing and became a life-long commitment. 17 The author himself has acknowledged the key role of the animal in his writings by turning it into a poetical metaphor. In his crucial essay Poetry

In: Taking Stock – Twenty-Five Years of Comparative Literary Research
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appear to almost ‘spring to life’ – all of these recipients do not confuse real life with a representation (an artifice or fictio ). Nor do they, as a rule, confuse reality with an imagined world (a fictum ), 2 for they know that they are holding a book in their hands, that they are watching a film

In: Taking Stock – Twenty-Five Years of Comparative Literary Research

and the reconstruction of collective identities. 3 Re-Writing European Identity: Péter Hunčík, Határeset (Borderline Case) The debut novel Határeset (Borderline Case, 2008) by psychiatrist Péter Hunčík, a Hungarian-minority author living in Slovakia and writing in Hungarian, can be called a

In: Taking Stock – Twenty-Five Years of Comparative Literary Research
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ignorance being invoked in the examples that follow, a wilful or else willed ignorance which relates more to life-knowledge (experience) than to book-knowledge (erudition). These characters consider themselves not just unschooled but unworldly, unsophisticated, artless. They find themselves at sea among

In: Aphoristic Modernity
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or because life abroad is cheaper than at home.) This kind of English tourists irritate Lewald: ‘Diese Engländer sind eine Plage in allen Hotels der Schweiz und Italiens.’ (119, These English are a nuisance in all hotels in Switzerland and in Italy.) Furthermore, they are a disturbance to the

In: Taking Stock – Twenty-Five Years of Comparative Literary Research
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living in the crisis (and little else, I fear). In this, it is also a doomed attempt to voice an appropriate political-social response by working with the problems of isolation, alienation and complexity. Those problems, I think, manifest most clearly as one problem. There is no answer to the problem

In: Modern Ecopoetry

‘reformed prelate’ 23 certainly worked for the Counterreformation 24 but he did so based on a rigorous interpretation of Augustine’s doctrine of grace (in the spirit of the ‘Catholic Reformist’, Hubert Jedin), not on the politically motivated, overwhelming aesthetics of the ‘propaganda fidei’. 2 The

In: Taking Stock – Twenty-Five Years of Comparative Literary Research