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Author: Summer Kim Lee

’s performances, Chambers-Letson writes that we have been given the grounds for “the communism of the incommensurable [that] flickers in and out of flesh” (196). The fifth chapter brings us to the end of a party in the 1980s in East Village started by Chinese artist Tseng Kwong Chi with his friend Keith Haring

In: Asian Diasporic Visual Cultures and the Americas
Author: Laura Kina

China and Japan until it was overthrown by Japan in 1879. Following World War ii and the decimation of the islands from the Battle of Okinawa, the United States occupied Okinawa from 1945 until it was re-annexed by Japan in 1972. Despite being less than one percent of the total landmass of Japan, it

In: Asian Diasporic Visual Cultures and the Americas

African American, Japanese American, Chinese American, and Jewish in the area. So I grew up with a lot of that. JM: I have done a bit of work on Samoan diasporic art (namely the work of Shigeyuki Kihara), and I understand one of the largest Samoan populations and probably a number of Pacific Island

In: Asian Diasporic Visual Cultures and the Americas
Author: Jave Yoshimoto

I was born in Japan to Chinese parents, my father from Hong Kong and my mother from Taiwan. While I have never met my father, my grandparents on my mother’s side had adopted the last name of Yoshimoto, when they were forced to become Japanese citizens during World War ii . Growing up, I was

In: Asian Diasporic Visual Cultures and the Americas

ywca , she recalled, “a girl who was playing with me asked what I was. I answered ‘Japanese’ and she would not believe me. She insisted that I tell her ‘Chinese,’ but how could I? Finally, she yelled ‘Get out jap !’” 44 The onset of war had a strong impact on her art: Tomoe believed she had

In: Asian Diasporic Visual Cultures and the Americas
Author: Yasuko Takezawa

East Asia, and extracted art treasures as part of the tribute to which it was entitled, its client states were quick to recognize the value of art as an instrument of diplomacy. First the Japanese, then the Chinese, Koreans, and other Asian peoples sent their art on exhibition to win the respect and

In: Asian Diasporic Visual Cultures and the Americas
Author: Ana Paulina Lee

contours of democracy versus authoritarianism, the limits of personal security, the fear of foreigners and each other, America’s love of guns, and its addiction to trauma. The one who is most suited to cure these national pathologies is a Chinese musical theater director who suggests that Chinese

In: Asian Diasporic Visual Cultures and the Americas

is work by Nebraska-based, Japan-born Chinese artist Jave Yoshimoto, who immigrated to the US when he was nine. In works such as his Humanitarian Crisis series, Yoshimoto focuses on the refugee crisis and ways in which the wars in Syria and Afghanistan continue to drive migrants through Turkey

In: Asian Diasporic Visual Cultures and the Americas
Author: Megumi Kitahara

. There were also ten or so black women, a few white Italians, three Chinese, and us four Japanese. The bizarre atmosphere at this workplace that brought together women of all different races and ethnicities, when one grew used to it, was actually rather fascinating.” 11 Individual ethnic

In: Asian Diasporic Visual Cultures and the Americas
Author: Yong Soon Min

(China) – selected for their historic, cultural, and geographic diversity and significance, and the opportunity to specifically look for the socio-political as well as the cultural and historical particularities embodied or imbricated in the selected artworks. Due to the scarcity of published research at

In: Asian Diasporic Visual Cultures and the Americas
Author: Falu Bakrania

Area. In this newly defined geographic region, Asians comprise the largest ethnic minority group, with Indians and Chinese representing the greater majorities. 18 The most recent estimate of Indian American entrepreneurs in Silicon Valley shows that in late 2001, they held wealth worth $60 billion

In: Asian Diasporic Visual Cultures and the Americas

appropriates elements of Kanō school of painting in his work. The Kanō school was the dominant Japanese painting academy from the fifteenth century into the modern era. With work ranging in subject and style, the Kanō school aesthetic can generally be characterized as a Japanese adaptation of Chinese landscape

In: Asian Diasporic Visual Cultures and the Americas

Imaging and Imagining the Chinese Caribbean: Jeanette Kong, Maria Lau, and Laura Fong Prosper  183 Sean Metzger Artist Pages Rituals, Remembrance, Rupture, and Repair: The Jhandi Flag in Contemporary Guyanese Art  195 Grace Aneiza Ali Mist and Rain

In: Asian Diasporic Visual Cultures and the Americas
Author: Nalini Mohabir

labourers would not have known the distance to their various destinations (in some cases, places so small they are literally off the world map of imperial cartography). Although indentured labourers were also brought from other parts of the world (for example, China, Portugal, and Africa), Indians formed

In: Asian Diasporic Visual Cultures and the Americas
Author: Marsha Pearce

identities are expected to perform. 3 Speaking from her lived experiences in a Trinidadian context, Jaime Lee Loy shares: This guy in my class would make all these jokes (…) these cracks about how [Chinese people] are not Trinidadians, [that] they always stick to themselves (…) but he would say it

In: Asian Diasporic Visual Cultures and the Americas
Author: Bakirathi Mani

together enunciation and dissolution, causality and effect, organic and nonorganic forces.” 3 In sculptures such as Her captivity… (2011), the heads of “Frozen Charlotte” china dolls appear to grow out of dead tree vines installed within a birdcage, as huge gourds protrude heavily out of the ornate

In: Asian Diasporic Visual Cultures and the Americas
Author: DIA

<br>- Chinese naval exercise <br>- Chinese naval-logistics support to North Vietnam <br>- Top Secret Umbra <br>- CREST

In: U.S. Intelligence on Asia, 1945-1991
Author: NSC

<br>- accidental violations of Chinese airspace <br>- Paracel Islands <br>- Top Secret/Sensitive/Contains Codeword <br>- RNL

In: U.S. Intelligence on Asia, 1945-1991
Author: CIA

<br>- China, Chiang Kai-shek, Mao Tse-tung, Chinese civil war <br>- deteriorating state of Chinese Nationalist government <br>- Secret <br>- CREST

In: U.S. Intelligence on Asia, 1945-1991
Author: CIA

<br>- internal politics <br>- military situation stable <br>- North China <br>- Secret <br>- worsening economic conditions <br>- CREST

In: U.S. Intelligence on Asia, 1945-1991
Author: CIA

<br>- prospects for negotiated settlement <br>- role of China and North Vietnam in peace talks <br>- Secret Spoke/NOFORN <br>- Sihanouk <br>- CREST

In: U.S. Intelligence on Asia, 1945-1991

<br>- clandestine reporting unreliable <br>- dearth of information <br>- Mao Tse-tung <br>- Secret/NOFORN/Eyes Only <br>- NARA <br>- Chinese foreign policy

In: U.S. Intelligence on Asia, 1945-1991
Author: CIA

<br>- buildup along Sino-Soviet border <br>- Chinese force posture <br>- comparative capabilities <br>- current Soviet force posture <br>- Top Secret Ruff Umbra/NOFORN <br>- USSR <br>- CREST

In: U.S. Intelligence on Asia, 1945-1991

<br>- diplomatic controversy <br>- Secret <br>- US-USSR understanding re China <br>- NARA

In: U.S. Intelligence on Asia, 1945-1991
Author: US Army

<br>- fall of Tsinan to Chinese Communist forces <br>- impact of loss on Chinese Nationalists <br>- Top Secret <br>- NARA

In: U.S. Intelligence on Asia, 1945-1991
Author: CIA

<br>- Chinese Nationalist navy <br>- naval blockade <br>- Secret <br>- warning to Isbrandtsen Company not to enter Chinese ports <br>- CIA

In: U.S. Intelligence on Asia, 1945-1991
Author: US Air Force

<br>- Chinese Air Force intended to destroy Chinese airlines airplanes impounded in Hong Kong <br>- Top Secret <br>- NARA

In: U.S. Intelligence on Asia, 1945-1991
Author: CIA

<br>- Chinese Nationalist security forces <br>- communist subversion <br>- possibility of popular rebellion <br>- Secret/Control - US Officials Only <br>- CREST

In: U.S. Intelligence on Asia, 1945-1991

<br>- plea not support proposed anti-communist guerrilla forces inside China <br>- Top Secret <br>- NARA

In: U.S. Intelligence on Asia, 1945-1991

<br>- Mao Tse-tung <br>- Secret/Sensitive <br>- NARA <br>- changes in Chinese foreign policy after Mao’s death

In: U.S. Intelligence on Asia, 1945-1991

<br>- emergency shipments of radio equipment to China <br>- press disclosure <br>- stay-behind agent networks <br>- Top Secret <br>- NARA

In: U.S. Intelligence on Asia, 1945-1991
Author: CIA

<br>- Chinese military leadership <br>- Secret/NOFORN <br>- CIA

In: U.S. Intelligence on Asia, 1945-1991
Author: CIA

<br>- Chinese foreign relations <br>- Chinese security policy <br>- Top Secret [codewords not declassified] <br>- USSR <br>- war of polemics <br>- CREST

In: U.S. Intelligence on Asia, 1945-1991