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, Trinidad, Suriname, and the Lesser Antilles. An estimated 150,000 Indians returned to India when their contracts expired while 350,000 settled in the Caribbean in exchange for their return passage. At the same time, thousands of Chinese contract laborers arrived in Cuba and the British Caribbean. The story

In: New West Indian Guide / Nieuwe West-Indische Gids

in the Caribbean welcomed refugees, many did not. Many of those in business and trade feared fresh competition, and consequently applied pressure on colonial officials. Just as previous migrants from Syria/Lebanon, China, or South Asia had once drawn hostility from certain quarters, so too did

In: New West Indian Guide / Nieuwe West-Indische Gids
Author: Teruyuki Tsuji

, but with infinite feasting and revelry in which Brahmin, Mohammedan, Confucianist and Romanist join in a catholic equality, all doing homage to the goddess who has indeed become all things to all men. Indeed, this is perhaps the only shrine in the world where Hindoo, Moslem, Chinese, Creole, Negro and

In: New West Indian Guide / Nieuwe West-Indische Gids
Author: Helen Yaffe

table” (p. 13). A cookbook published in 1914 declared: “There is perhaps no country in the world, other than in China or India, where rice has come to signify the meal par excellence” (p. 18). Indeed, by the early twentieth century, Cuba’s per capita consumption of rice ranked among the world’s highest

In: New West Indian Guide / Nieuwe West-Indische Gids

divisive even today. 15 By the 1890 s Australians decided they wanted to have a more homogeneous white society, and, therefore, legislated to prevent immigration of Chinese, Indian, and Japanese, as well as Pacific lslanders. 16 Since the Australians still wanted to produce their own sugar, even without

In: Journal of Global Slavery
Author: Benedetta Rossi

-produced objects from China and Nigeria on Niger’s markets. While in the 1920s and 1930s their monopoly of these crafts constituted a concrete avenue of social mobility, since the 1980s they have been finding it harder and harder to meet their subsistence needs by practicing traditional crafts. Avenues of economic

In: Journal of Global Slavery

trace a unique route from the Adriatic Sea region of the European middle ages to the Ming-Qing period of late imperial China, and from the French colony of Saint-Domingue in the Caribbean around 1700 to the Tahoua region of contemporary Niger in West Africa. The first article, by Juliane Schiel

In: Journal of Global Slavery

1 Introduction Over the past decades, “wage labor” has been a lingering issue in studies on the development patterns of late imperial China. The legal reconfiguration of the category of “hired laborers” ( gugong 僱工), in particular, has been foregrounded as a salient

In: Journal of Global Slavery
Author: Tatiana Seijas

discrete topic—the cultural tastes of people who purchased goods from China and Japan—is based on an analysis of wills and testaments, account books, personal letters, and more. An appendix provides details on the book’s primary sources. The introduction contains a short overview of Manila, Mexico City

In: New West Indian Guide / Nieuwe West-Indische Gids
Authors: Richard Price and Sally Price

“Sometime around 1935 [in Suriname], my Catholic grandmother with her Chinese name and her Hindu indentured ancestors met my grandfather, the child of a German man and his Creole concubine and the descendant of enslaved Africans, and fell in love.” Her book recounts her efforts to delve deeply into her

In: New West Indian Guide / Nieuwe West-Indische Gids
Author: Sally Price

ritual, but aimed at (and realized with the help of) participants from all the ethnic groups who lived along the river, from Javanese and Chinese to Creoles and Amerindians. As described by Brazilian anthropologist Olívia Gomes da Cunha, it constituted “a composition of practices decontextualized from

In: New West Indian Guide / Nieuwe West-Indische Gids
Author: John Ermer

, and while contributors do consider future scenarios, they do not claim to wield excessive powers of prophesy. The first of the book’s three parts, “Economics,” evaluates Cuban economic reforms since the fall of the Soviet Union, comparing them with the experiences of China and the East Asian

In: New West Indian Guide / Nieuwe West-Indische Gids

Arab, Persian, Chinese, Malay, Indonesian and Indian traders even before the colonial period. When illustrating music genres, it is simply not adequate to write or speak about melodies, rhythms and songs. The best method of communicating is through live music. In this respect, the film highlights

In: Journal of Global Slavery
Author: Jingyi Song
Denver’s Chinatown 1875-1900: Gone But Not Forgotten explores the coming of the Chinese to the Western frontier and their experiences in Denver during its early development from a supply station for the mining camps to a flourishing urban center. The complexity of race, class, immigration, politics, and economic policies interacted dynamically and influenced the life of early Chinese settlers in Denver. The Denver Riot, as a consequence of political hostility and racial antagonism against the Chinese, transformed the life of Denver’s Chinese, eventually leading to the disappearance of Denver's Chinatown. But the memory of a neighborhood that was part of the colorful and booming urban center remains.
Author: Bernard Moitt

International Labor Organization and estimates from the Global Slavery Index among other data, he illustrates the growth and decline of coerced labor globally while highlighting the rise of “new slavery” up until contemporary times. This essay covers (but is not limited to) the Americas, Africa, China, the

In: New West Indian Guide / Nieuwe West-Indische Gids

Matènwa is a tiny community on the island of La Gonâve off the coast of Haiti. The school was founded in 1996 by Matènwa-born rural literacy expert Abner Sauveur and Boston-based Chinese-American teacher Christine W. Low and was developed in cooperation with the community itself. It operates entirely in

In: New West Indian Guide / Nieuwe West-Indische Gids

dynamics, which are quite distinct from those in China or Viet Nam. Nevertheless, beginning your approach to the Cuban economy through this book could be an enjoyable and fulfilling experience if you plunge into its pages with an open mind and a desire to learn about how inventive and hard-working people

In: New West Indian Guide / Nieuwe West-Indische Gids

-generation Mexican Americans who retain markers of cultural authenticity. Just as later-generation Mexican Americans are questioned in being “real Mexicans,” scholarship on third- and later-generation Chinese and Japanese Americans describe the ways in which they feel their legitimacy as “real Asians” is questioned

In: Filipino American Transnational Activism

opposed the Philippine Left’s official support for China’s invasion of Vietnam in 1979, which further “sharpened” their disagreement (Cruz et al. 2017, 17). Simultaneously in 1978, a former member of the Chicago kdp chapter, alienated from kdp , contacted a member of iafp (International Association

In: Filipino American Transnational Activism

style of the murals by npaa was influenced by the political art created during the Chinese Cultural Revolution. 22 This led to traditionally radical images of raised arms with clenched fists and militant stances of figures within the murals. Meanwhile, the artists in Kaisahan built off of npaa ’s

In: Filipino American Transnational Activism

estimated 49% of the Indian population were illiterate. This was relatively high when compared to 13.8% Coloureds, 3.2% Whites and 13.9% Chinese. 14 After almost a decade an increase to 2,926 students in 1945 reflected the expansion in population but also suggested that Indians were realising the

In: Beyond the Legacy of the Missionaries and East Indians

Juan, Penal, Las Lomas and Curepe Presbyterian Churches. There are also Whites and Chinese who are Presbyterians. For instance, the late Professor Peter Bacon was an English-born White, who worshipped at Aramalaya Presbyterian Church. Initially, the missionaries ensured the Indians were properly

In: Beyond the Legacy of the Missionaries and East Indians

, composed of Mahommedans and worshippers of Idols, for then there were few Christians, contributed about £150 sterling.” 34 This philanthropic gesture was probably because their children attended the mission schools. Others who contributed to the building fund of the Susamachar Church were Chinese, White

In: Beyond the Legacy of the Missionaries and East Indians

Presbyterian schools, their selection of students was biased with a percentage of Africans 1.1%, Chinese 0.4%, Indians 78.9%, Mixed race 16.5%, Syrian Lebanese 1.1% and Whites 1.9%. 7 The Chamber of Commerce noted that race was the dominant variable thereby portraying the denominational boards as deliberately

In: Beyond the Legacy of the Missionaries and East Indians

Chinese Indenture System in the British West Indies and its Aftermath,” in Andrew Wilson editor, The Chinese in the Caribbean (Princeton: Markus Wiener Publishers, 2004) 7. 3 Dale Bisnauth, The Settlement of Indians in Guyana 1890–1930 (Leeds: Peepal Tree Press, 2000) 11. 4 Laxmi Mansingh and Ajai

In: Beyond the Legacy of the Missionaries and East Indians

Department were inter-racial and inter-denominational, including Hindu and Moslem students, too. Recognized as one of the best institutions of higher learning in the south, not only Indian and Negro, but Chinese and European also attended n . g . h . s . 60 Florient Naranjit, retired teacher of a private

In: Beyond the Legacy of the Missionaries and East Indians

societies and organizations had never existed among the Presbyterian schools. There were also lecturers of Chinese descent including Edward Yee who taught General Science and James Lee Wah who lectured in Drama. Lloyd Persaud, a former student of ntc during 1960–1961 and member of Nistar Presbyterian