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Author: James I. Matray

, Sheila Miyoshi Jager, and Masuda Hajimu added important works on the Korean War, but most recently Monica Kim in The Interrogation Rooms of the Korean War: The Untold History (2019) and David Cheng Chang in The Hijacked War: The Story of Chinese POWs in the Korean War (2020) have examined the

In: Journal of American-East Asian Relations
Author: Sunwoo Lee

choose an ideology was to choose a country. However, the pow  s had minimal experience of a living in a modern nation state, and hardly were aware of the grave consequences of their decisions. But they had to choose, and the statistical result was 22,607 Chinese and Korean non-repatriates. Eighty

In: Journal of American-East Asian Relations

The Korean War broke out seventy years ago, resulting in three years of mass destruction and killing. More than 36,000 Americans, 180,000 Chinese, and millions of North and South Koreans were killed in the war. Unlike the official and popular remembrance of World War ii , commemorations of the

In: Journal of American-East Asian Relations

David Cheng Chang David Cheng Chang is associate professor of history at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. He received a Ph.D. in Modern Chinese History from the University of California, San Diego. He studies the history of the Korean War, World War II interpreters, the

In: Journal of American-East Asian Relations
Author: Jung Byung Joon

Korea, or the anti-Communists in South Korea. Under the terms of the armistice, these pow s could reject repatriation. The vast majority of non-repatriates chose to reside in either of the Koreas, the People’s Republic of China ( prc ), or Taiwan. But a small group exercised the option to go to

In: Journal of American-East Asian Relations
Author: Jung Keun Sik

located at the Douglas MacArthur Memorial Library and Archives in Norfolk, VA, which is in English with the names of people or places in Chinese characters as well. The number of his interrogation report is atis (Allied Translator and Interpreter Section) 2338, dated 22 November 1950. His field report

In: Journal of American-East Asian Relations
Author: Jinhyun Lee

The Paris Agreement made a breakthrough amid the deadlock in climate negotiations, yet concerns are raised regarding how much impact the new voluntary climate regime can make. This paper investigates the socialization mechanism that the Paris Agreement sets up and explores the prospects of “institutional transformation” for it to make a dent. It examines the factors that can facilitate voluntary climate action by using the cases of the most recalcitrant emitters, the United States and China. It argues that the US and China cases suggest that the socialization from the bottom-up by domestic actors may be one of the critical elements that determine states’ position on climate change.

In: Asian International Studies Review
Author: Kathleen Burke

. 4 People from the eastern Malay-Indonesian archipelago and the Coromandel, Malabar, and Bengal regions of India poured into Batavia, with high slave mortality rates encouraging a continuous flow of new slaves throughout most of the century. 5 Chinese migrants from Fujian province were another

In: Crossroads
Author: Rolf Hobson

place like Iraq? For that matter, how utopian is it to work for the fall of the Communist Party in China after a far more powerful and stable oligarchy fell in the Soviet Union?” 40 3 Full Spectrum Dominance from rma to coin While the pundits put their case before the court of public opinion, the

In: Civilizing Missions in the Twentieth Century
Authors: Boris Barth and Rolf Hobson

societies by emulating western economic success, and a limited adoption of western political institutions. The Tanzimat reform programme in the Ottoman empire during the mid-nineteenth century was an early example, which was to be followed by the Meiji restoration in Japan, the Chinese, Turkish and Mexican

In: Civilizing Missions in the Twentieth Century
Author: Frank Ninkovich

demolition of scientific racism by modern science; the development of modernization theory in sociology and political science; the explosion of political consciousness and formidable liberation movements in India, China, Indonesia, Indochina, Algeria and elsewhere; the disappointing failure of empire in many

In: Civilizing Missions in the Twentieth Century
Author: Jost Dülffer

to create a worldwide oecd zone when China and India become major players. In other contexts there are many fruitful debates on transformation. What began as a convincing approach to former communist Eastern Europe has now developed into a broader concept which can also be applied to failed

In: Civilizing Missions in the Twentieth Century

they were a superior people? And in what sense, asked this latter-day disciple of Voltaire, could “les Hindous” or the Chinese be called “races inférieures”? There was no reason why they should be less “civilized” than Europeans. Behind the rhetoric of superiority and inferiority something else was

In: Civilizing Missions in the Twentieth Century
Author: Esther Moeller

languages of the movement. 48 Until that time only English and French, and later Spanish, Chinese and Russian were either official or working languages of the Red Cross movement. 49 The Arab initiative did not succeed immediately in the sense that Arabic became one of the official or working languages of

In: Civilizing Missions in the Twentieth Century
Author: Shaul Marmari

in the east to Port Said in the west, may be defined with reference to the origins or destinations of their members. One could justifiably speak of, say, a Baghdadi diaspora or a Jewish diaspora in China. This article, however, seeks other spatial frameworks in which all these migrations and

In: Crossroads

various ethnic and religious groups (Chinese Buddhists, Malay Muslims, European Christians and others). The water-related topography of Batavia provided the Dutch East India Company with the means either to restrict or to permit interaction between different neighbourhoods. 21 In addition, the canals

In: Crossroads

–1945) mainly focuses on the treaty port of Shanghai, a central node integrated into Britain’s imperial network and the network of Indian migration. 1 Enjoying the privilege of foreign treaties imposed on the Chinese, the Shanghai Settlement fell to some extent within the reach of the British Empire, but it

In: Crossroads

-7-3032-1378-8. Chineseness has been widely discussed in recent decades. In the 1990s, a fierce debate erupted on this issue between Evelyn Rawski and Ho Ping-Ti 何炳棣. The former emphasized the Manchu character of the Qing Empire, while Ho argued that Sinicization had played the most important role in Manchu ideology. In

In: Crossroads

Wang Ruliang 王汝良. Zhongguo wenxue zhong de Yindu xingxiang yanjiu 中國文學中的印度形象研究 (The Image of India in Chinese Literature). Beijing: Zhonghua shuju, 2018. 286 pp. ISBN : 978-71-01-13030-0. Despite recent innovations in the emerging field of China-India studies, literary approaches have long

In: Crossroads
Author: Wu Lin-chun

Scholars long have seen the “open door” policy U.S. Secretary of State John Hay proposed in 1899 as a major turning point in Chinese-American relations, with the policy becoming the highest guiding principle of U.S. policy towards China until World War ii . 1 In contrast, writers have paid

In: Journal of American-East Asian Relations
Author: James I. Matray

intensifying the pressure on China to grant each control over commerce and investment in its ports. Britain saw this as a threat to its long-standing dominant position in China and approached the United States with a proposal for joint action to prevent spheres of exclusive interest in China. President William

In: Journal of American-East Asian Relations
Author: Kuan-Jen Chen

underwater natural resources made the international politics volatile in maritime East Asia. 3 The high probability of oil reserves under the seabed of the East China Sea that the 1969 Emery report identified brought the United States, with its cutting-edge exploration techniques and financial power, to

In: Journal of American-East Asian Relations

painfully aware his own outdated vessels were no match for the Imperial Japanese Navy in quantity or quality, and had begun, even prior to the outbreak of war, to remove as many ships as possible out of harm’s way in China to Manila. Once the Japanese attacked the Philippines, Hart withdrew his forces

In: Journal of American-East Asian Relations
Author: Liu Zhaokun

(Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2020). 496 pp. $40.00 (cloth) On 23 January 1954, the UN Command released 14,342 Chinese prisoners of war ( pow s) to Taiwan. For decades, interpretations of the fact that more than two thirds of Chinese prisoners “voluntarily” went to Taiwan, rather

In: Journal of American-East Asian Relations
Author: Rob York

Chollima movement of the late 1950s and early 1960s typifying its efforts. It also details Kim’s successful purging of rivals—those aligned with Soviet Russia and Maoist China – within the government. The fourth follows the conclusion of that process, as Kim eliminated the last of his domestic rivals and

In: Journal of American-East Asian Relations

articles written (on the Chinese model). When academic freedom is threatened, so is democracy. In this unique context, anthropologists are mired in paradox: the knowledge accumulated has never seemed so crucial, but everywhere anthropologists are prevented from working. The other social scientists claim to

In: Political Anthropological Research on International Social Sciences (PARISS)

themselves as the unique vector of the universal, and have recognised recently the competition from the Chinese publishing industry only to unanimously reject it as an illegitimate competitor for expressing global knowledge. Therefore the rules they have put in place for writing and reviewing are born under

In: Political Anthropological Research on International Social Sciences (PARISS)
Author: Irit Back

for joining the process. One was the recognition of its inability to achieve a military victory; the second was economic. Due to the discovery of significant reserves of oil in the 1990s, Khartoum strengthened its commercial ties with non-Western powers, primarily China, and purchased copious amounts

In: From Sudan to South Sudan
Author: Irit Back

initiating “ igad - plus ,” a revised process designed to create a unified international front based on the active participation of partners, including the AU, UN, EU, China, United States, Britain, Norway, and others. igad wished to use this process to discuss important issues such as the basic power

In: From Sudan to South Sudan