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than taking a purely textual perspective, and explicitly stated that the people should be allowed to choose whatever they see fit in their governance. This appeal notes an essential transformation in the movement from an ideological dogmatic movement, which views reality in terms of absolutist black

In: Journal of Islamic Ethics

that the Indigenous psychology movement has grown (for example see Marsella, 2013)— All Psychology is Indigenous Psychology i.e. Latino/a Psychology, Asian Psychology, Native America Psychology, Black Psychology, Western Psychology, American Psychology etc.). This raises the question, what would

In: Journal of Islamic Ethics

du philosophe et du médecin Ibn Ṭumlūs , iii, n. 3. 56 See, Deborah L. Black, Logic and Aristotle’s “Rhetoric” and “Poetics” in Medieval Arabic Philosophy (Leiden-New York-Cologne: E.J. Brill, 1990), 247; A. Hasnawi writes: “In fact […] the inclusion of the Rhetoric and the Poetics was in the

In: Ibn Ṭumlūs (Alhagiag Bin Thalmus d. 620/1223), Compendium on Logic al-Muḫtaṣar fī al-manṭiq

SIEPM Freiburg (Germany) August 20–23, 2014, ed. Nadja Germann and Steven Harvey. 44 ‮صار هذا معروفا بين الدارسين. ويمكن العودة إلى الدراسة الجيدة والرائدة:‬‎ Deborah L. Black, Logic and Aristotle’s “Rhetoric” and “Poetics” in Medieval Arabic Philosophy (Leiden-New York-Cologne: E.J. Brill, 1990). 45

In: Ibn Ṭumlūs (Alhagiag Bin Thalmus d. 620/1223), Compendium on Logic al-Muḫtaṣar fī al-manṭiq

shadow to the remoteness it has from its subject. He mentions in this very chapter that mountains seem black and the Sun the size of a shield when viewed from afar; this lack of color and accuracy is due to distance ( buʿd ). But he maintains that the shadow is still ineluctably linked to its subject and

In: Knowing God: Ibn ʿArabī and ʿAbd al-Razzāq al-Qāshānī’s Metaphysics of the Divine

nevertheless adhering firmly to his linguistic principles and avoiding recourse to purely rational considerations. A simple example is the following ḥadīth , reported on the authority of Ibn ʿAbbās: “The Black Stone is the right hand of God on earth; whoever shakes it and kisses it, it is as if he had shaken

In: Ibn Taymiyya on Reason and Revelation

a later work, Maqālāt al-Islāmiyyīn (Theological doctrines of the Muslims), however, his tone is calmer and his positions are less black and white, as he is freer to “take the spoils from defeated Muʿtazilism and enrich therewith a henceforth orthodox kalām ” 126 (which, for Ibn Taymiyya, it

In: Ibn Taymiyya on Reason and Revelation

passage, where he states that judgements ( al-qaḍāʾ bi-anna ) such as that black and white are contraries ( yataḍāddān ), or that motion and rest are contradictory ( yatanāqaḍān ), or that a body cannot be in two places at one and the same time are akin to “all universal propositions that [, which

In: Ibn Taymiyya on Reason and Revelation

nigra et citrina), which renders χολὴ ξανθὴ καὶ μέλαινα (‘yellow and black bile’) in inversion. In Galen we also find χολὴ πυρρά (‘yellowish-red bile’). The scribe W 3 could be referring to this in his note nigra rubea to utraque cholera ( → app.  I ), but it may also be an alternative

In: Aristotle De Animalibus. Michael Scot's Arabic-Latin Translation, Volume 1a: Books I-III: History of Animals

down ⟨are a sign⟩ of enviousness’). 492a2 magna valde is Scot’s interpretative translation of ‮شديد السواد‬‎ , which should actually be translated by ‘magnae nigredinis’. But since nigredo has already been used in the same sentence as the translation of τὸ μέλαν (‘the black, or dark, part of the

In: Aristotle De Animalibus. Michael Scot's Arabic-Latin Translation, Volume 1a: Books I-III: History of Animals