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Editor: O'Fahey
The present volume is fascicle A of volume III of Arabic Literature of Africa, edited by J.O. Hunwick and R.S. O'Fahey. The fascicle, compiled by O'Fahey and several collaborators, covers the Islamic writings of Northeastern Africa in Arabic and in several local languages, including Amharic, Tigrinya, Harari and Somali.
Geographically, the fascicle covers the modern states of Eritrea, Ethiopia, Djibouti and Somalia. Although the Islamic literature of the region is limited, it includes an important poetic tradition in Somali and Harari and the writings of a major scholar of the colonial period in Eritrea. The volume is divided into four chapters and follows the usual ALA format. It will be followed by fascicle B, which will cover East Africa, especially Kenya and Tanzania.
Editors: John Hunwick and O'Fahey
Eventually to be completed in six volumes, Arabic Literature of Africa will provide a survey of Muslim authors writing in Arabic in Saharan and sub-Saharan Africa and a bibliography of their works. Falling within the tradition of the great works of Brockelmann and Sezgin, it will form a basic reference tool for the study of Arabic writing in areas of the African Islamic world that fall outside the parameters of these works. While primarily a work of reference, it will also attempt to provide an outline of the intellectual history of Muslim societies in the areas it covers: the Nile valley, East Africa and the Horn of Africa, West Africa and the western Sahara, from earliest times to the present.
The first volume covers Eastern Sudanic Africa (mainly the modern Sudan) until approximately 1900. It comprises twelve chapters organised by theme or period and aims to present as complete a coverage as the present state of our knowledge will allow.

b. c. 1850, d. early 1940s. Andrzejewski and Lewis (1964), 58. A member of Habar Tolja’lo; he travelled widely in Aden and East Africa and uses his knowledge of Arabic, English, Swahili and Hindustanti in his poetry. He often worked as an interpreter and guide for foreigners. He was a prolific poet

In: Arabic Literature of Africa Online

Abokor, Axmed Cali (1987)The Camel in Somali Oral Traditions. Uppsala.Adam, Hussein M. (1968)A Nation in Search of a Script. The Problem of Establishing a National Orthography for Somali. MA thesis. Makerere: University of East Africa.Adan, Alawi Ali (1992)“A general review of Somali Arabic

In: Arabic Literature of Africa Online

), Rashīdiyya, Ṣāliḥiyya and Dandarāwiyya ṭarīqas that were to spread to Egypt, Ottoman Turkey, the former Yugoslavia and Albania, Syria, Somalia, East Africa and southeast Asia, and the most recently es...

In: Arabic Literature of Africa Online

The Ibadis in the Region of the Indian Ocean. Section One : East Africa , Hildesheim-Zürich-New York, Georg Olms Verlag (« Studies on Ibadism and Oman », 1), 2013, 446 p., isbn : 978-3-487-14801-4, 68 € relié. Le livre de Heinz Gaube, consacré à la côte swahilie, se veut une compilation

In: Arabica
Author: Kees Versteegh

/ Arabica 56 (2009) 466-494 acquainted with a wide array of Arabic books, rather than a restrictive selection. Th is is quite similar to the process described by Laff an in his article. A similar development is sketched for the Swahili-speaking region in East Africa by Jean-Claude Penrad, “L’intangible et la

In: Arabica

southerly courses were practiced along the coasts of East Africa, India, the Malay peninsula and Sumatra, i.e. in areas of monsoon navigation. In this whole region the use of magnetic needle in pre-European times is still contested. The Arabic sources describe boussole and compass but the geographic extent

In: Arabica

fame not only as an interpreter of the Koran but also as a chess 2 player and polit- ical activist. The combination of scholar, player and rebel is the more unusual since he was a freed black slave from East Africa. 3 Sa ’“ d b. ] ubayr was one of the most learned of the second generation Muslims. 4 As

In: Arabica
Author: Dan Shapira

acquainted with East and North-East Africa, 5 and so it seems, it was in their footsteps that the Muslims (Arabs and/or Iranians and others, too) were able to © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2002 Arabica , tome XLIX,1 118 notes et documents 3. ka Fr  d ˜ n mad, aw Òˆ n az é r ˆ n- Ò ahr dw ˆ rist h

In: Arabica