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Eventually to be completed in six volumes Arabic Literature of Africa will provide a survey of Muslim authors writing in Arabic in Saharan and sub-Saharan Africa and a bibliography of their works. Falling within the tradition of the great works of Brockelmann and Sezgin, it will form a basic reference tool for the study of Arabic writing in areas of the African Islamic world that fall outside the parameters of these works. While primarily a work of reference, it will also attempt to provide an outline of the intellectual history of Muslim societies in the areas it covers: the Nile valley, East Africa and the Horn of Africa, West Africa and the western Sahara, from earliest times to the present.
With the increasing international importance of East Asia in economic, political, and cultural terms, more and more readers are interested in better understanding this part of the world which can boast long-standing histories and traditions as well as vibrating modern cultures. This book series publishes substantial comparative research on the literary and cultural traditions of premodern and modern East Asia and their relation to the world. It welcomes in particular forms of comparative analysis that combine the depth of area-study-expertise and philology with theoretical acumen and a courageous orientation towards fundamental questions.
The series aims to showcase original research on the methodology and practice of comparison in three main areas: intra-Asian comparisons of China, Korea, Japan, and Vietnam; East-West comparisons that examine Western alongside East Asian traditions and explore their historical encounters and cultural interactions; and multi-polar studies that examine East Asian literatures and cultures in light of their relations with India, the Middle East, Africa, or Latin America. The series focuses on the core humanities such as literature, history, religion, philosophy and thought, art history, and archaeology, but also welcomes contributions adopting culturally-informed approaches in anthropology, political science, sociology, or linguistics.
The series is directed at scholars and graduate students of East Asia and, more broadly, comparatists engaged in the study of various literary and cultural traditions around the world. We publish English-language monographs, conference volumes, and, occasionally, English translations of outstanding scholarship in other languages.

The series has published an average of 2,5 volumes per year since 2014.
The present English translation reproduces the original German of Carl Brockelmann’s Geschichte der Arabischen Litteratur (GAL) as accurately as possible. In the interest of user-friendliness the following emendations have been made in the translation: Personal names are written out in full, except b. for ibn; Brockelmann’s transliteration of Arabic has been adapted to comply with modern standards for English-language publications; modern English equivalents are given for place names, e.g. Damascus, Cairo, Jerusalem, etc.; several erroneous dates have been corrected, and the page references to the two German editions have been retained in the margin, except in the Supplement volumes, where new references to the first two English volumes have been inserted.
The present English translation reproduces the original German of Carl Brockelmann’s Geschichte der Arabischen Litteratur (GAL) as accurately as possible. In the interest of user-friendliness the following emendations have been made in the translation: Personal names are written out in full, except b. for ibn; Brockelmann’s transliteration of Arabic has been adapted to comply with modern standards for English-language publications; modern English equivalents are given for place names, e.g. Damascus, Cairo, Jerusalem, etc.; several erroneous dates have been corrected, and the page references to the two German editions have been retained in the margin, except in the Supplement volumes, where new references to the first two English volumes have been inserted.

Athens, Venice, Flanders, Canton, Tehran, Lahore and Havana. This travelling culture was neither a symptom of an eccentric and bygone past, nor only a reflection of a modern interest in Oriental studies. During the Cold War, for example, new political networks between the Middle East, Africa, Asia

In: Journal of World Literature

-western literatures together. As a result, the geographies handled by this journal span the five regions of Asia, Euro-America, the Middle East, Africa, and Latin America. Although the Middle East is not usually set apart from Asia and Africa, as it lies between the two continents, this journal recognizes the

In: Journal of World Literature

, and they are what keeps Eurasiachronology from becoming universal history. African written literatures of the pre-modern period might seem to present a somewhat more complex case. Interestingly, Abu-Lughod hesitates about the inclusion of the Swahili East African coast (as well as “Spain, Germany

In: Journal of World Literature

particularly important as it sheds light on less-studied aspects of the institute’s activities, such as its relations with Japan and its colonial entanglements in Italian East Africa. On related topics, Giuseppe Fidotta, ‘Ruling the Colonies with Sound: Documentary, Technology and Noise in Cronache dell

In: The Year’s Work in Modern Language Studies

” is as oceanic as the “Chinese and East Africans, Arabs and Malays, Bengalis and Goans, Tamils and Arakanese” (13) seamen who form the eponymous tribe of “Lascars.” Vowels collapse into consonants with the same ease as the syntax and vocabulary from Southern European, Northern African, South-, and

In: Journal of World Literature

they are seldom studied in conjunction. Anthropologist Linda Giles (1999), for example, researched spirit culture on the East African coast and described how the spirit groups represent the people’s own and neighboring cultures: in spirit possession rituals, the trancing mediums wear clothes, eat foods

In: Narrative Cultures and the Aesthetics of Religion