Search Results

The Restless Mind and the Living Text

The First Edition of Grotius’s De iure belli ac pacis

Douglas J. Osler

in a second state: with a corrected text, but still without the indices. Two surviving copies bear witness to this hybrid state. One is the copy in Salzburg. Here we find that gathering 5F is in its reset condition, with Cap. xxiv moved on to page 781, as explained above, and the corrections made

Randall Lesaffer

contribution of the peace to modern international law can indeed be reduced to a post factum europeaniza- tion of the German constitutional and religious settlement and thus to the very particular triple or hybrid character of the treaties, or whether, on the contrary, the peace included important new or

Alain Wijffels

- oretical, scholarly treatise. The end result is a hybrid construction, which pro- vides a 'still' from the evolutionary process towards a specific treatment of the law of naval warfare and related subjects. With reference to an example of bio- logical evolution, the structure of the Hispallica Advocafio is

Brad Hinshelwood

ignores this question. The reader is thus left to glean insights from Grotius’s scattered comments addressing specific issues. Instead of the hybrid transfer and self-sufficiency theory present in De Indis , Grotius shifts to an account that emphasizes limitations on the subject’s rights in light of

Franco Todescan

origin. Th rough the mediation of the collective will of men, taken as rational crea- tures, derives from the jus naturae the jus naturale secundarium (or jus gentium primarium ), which is hierarchically followed by a category of hybrid norms belonging at the same time to jus civile , jus gentium , jus

Brad Hinshelwood

ignores this question. The reader is thus left to glean insights from Grotius’s scattered comments addressing specific issues. Instead of the hybrid transfer and self-sufficiency theory present in De Indis , Grotius shifts to an account that emphasizes limitations on the subject’s rights in light of

Vid Prislan and Nico Schrijver

the Roman empire, the shore was considered property of the Roman people. Hence, he also concedes that the entire shore could be claimed as the property of the state ( ibid. , p. 31). As Perruso comments, Grotius appar- ently treats the shore as a hybrid between public and common property. Perruso

John D. Haskell

discovers that it owes its origin to something else. And it must acknowledge the fateful power of this origin, for otherwise it will lose its orientation to reason in the blind alley of a hybrid grasp of control over its own self … Philosophy, too, has been led to a self-reflection with regard to its own