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Joseph Savirimuthu

International Journal of Children’s Rights 19 (2011) 547–569 © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2011 DOI 10.1163/157181811X587340 brill.nl/chil T HE I NTERNATIONAL J OURNAL OF C HILDREN ’ S R IGHTS Th e EU, Online Child Safety and Media Literacy Joseph Savirimuthu School of Law and Social Justice

TV or Not TV

Spelling the Indonesian Media with Veven Sp. Wardhana

Edwin Jurriëns

will demonstrate the similarities and differences between his work and the initiatives of the Komisi Penyiaran Indonesia ( KPI , Indonesian Broadcasting Commission), the main institution for monitoring the broadcast media in Indonesia, and the broader Indonesian media watch and media literacy movement

Teresa Podlesney

In The Sense of an Ending, Frank Kermode reminds us that ‘[f]ictions, notably the fiction of apocalypse, turn easily into myths; people will live by that which was designed only to know by’. When the hermeneutic function of contemporary apocalyptic narratives is recovered, they can be interrogated to reveal the contemporary social, political, and environmental contexts that give rise to ideas of a 21st-century apocalypse. Engaging students in critical thinking about apocalypse through the study of contemporary movies produces an understanding of how our popular entertainments document and re-imagine real-world concerns. Historicizing and deconstructing narratives of 21st-century apocalypse also fosters students’ historical self-awareness and sense of agency, opening dialogue on how we can co-create more equitable and sustainable systems for living in and through the complex now. Articulating the cultural power of apocalypse cinema as both ‘structure of feeling’ and ‘framework of intelligibility’, this chapter outlines three interlocking strategies for apocalypse cinema and/as transformative pedagogy: developing media literacy skills, fostering an awareness of living history, and taking zombies seriously.

Priya Chadha

Adolescents constitute a fifth of the world’s population. Adolescents have twenty-four hours media access and, being the most vulnerable, prefer watching television to any kind of physical activity. Physical activity plays an imperative role in the overall development of adolescents. Television viewing for long hours leads to decreased physical activity. The objectives of the study were to examine television use by adolescents for the purpose of entertainment and information in government and private schools as well as the association between television viewing and physical activity of adolescents. The study was done on a sample size of 400 adolescents aged 12-19 years studying in government and private schools in the city of Chandigarh. 200 male and 200 female adolescents were divided into two age groups, i.e. 12-15 and 16-19 years. The data was collected by way of a survey method using a self–constructed questionnaire. Statistical analysis was done on SPSS using tools like chi-square test, central tendency (mean); dispersion (standard deviation) and paired t- test to show the results on the basis of hours divided in four categories, i.e. very often (4 or more hours a day), quite often (2-4), seldom (0-2) and never (0). Results from the findings indicate that adolescents were mainly watching television for an entertainment purpose. Adolescents of 12-15 years were watching less television than 16-19 years adolescents. It was further revealed that private school adolescents in the age group of 12-15 years were more involved in physical activity. However, as age progresses difference fade out. It goes without saying that the role of media is going to increase manifold in the years to come, therefore, the paper through review of literature also addresses the need of teaching media literacy to adolescents so that they become critical consumers of media and media messages.

Martin Roth

distant servers, and regularly accept licensing agreements for these products and services without reading them. I have described this elsewhere as media use under conditions of a ‘suspension of media literacy’ (Roth 2018). This observation is based on an understanding of media literacy as consisting of

Series:

Edited by Ann Watts Pailliotet and Peter B. Mosenthal

Information about issues and procedures for media or visual literacy is currently widely dispersed. This title advances current scholarship by transcending traditional research boundaries and combining a number of different backgrounds, such as cultural studies, reading, computers and technology, sociology, textual criticism. It supports an interdisciplinary curriculum; in depth reviews of how media and visual literacy support and extend current print literacy theories and practices; it provides explicit examples of research methodologies and accounts of implementation procedures and policies in schools and colleges. This work focuses on a wide spectrum of media like film, television, children's picture books, computers and newspapers. The contributing authors, who read as a who is who in media literacy come from diverse disciplines, locations, and backgrounds, employ varied lenses and formats to provide broad, innovative definitions of literacy.

Laura Kinsella

Changes in information communication technology met with digital literacies offer new modes and models of creative expression, connecting through participatory culture, co-creation and produsage. This chapter draws from my collaborative, practice-led ethnographic doctoral research ‘Exploring the Media Literacy Practices of a Transcultural Youth- Led Community in Cork City, Ireland’. In the study, provisional findings suggest that research participants use their media literacy practices to cultivate solidarity to deal with the impact of ‘big’ events, that of family separation and issues specifically facing migrant youth. My multi-modal research takes place in an urban media hub in Cork City centre, Ireland’s second largest city, and examines the lived identities and media practices of youth (16-25), some of whom are at various stages of the migration process. This generation of young people are frequently referred to as the ‘new Ireland’, with one in seven now coming from a migrant background. Despite this, there is a paucity of research on the settlement experiences of migrant youth. This chapter aims to explore how migrant youth connect with each other through the co-creation of media content, providing pathways for solidarity and social inclusion. This shows how media literacy practices function as a means of creative expression and connection, representing an autonomous generational response to the material challenges facing youth themselves.

Premalatha Karupiah

Cultural products, such as art, literature and movies are important in the transmission of beauty ideals in a society. These cultural products convey material and non-material ideals related to beauty. Cultural products may convey ideals that are accepted or expected in a society and also those that are not seen as the norm in a society. In Tamil culture, traditionally, physical beauty ideals are discussed with other ideals related to one’s character. This chapter compares the perception on beauty ideals in Tamil movies by Malaysian Indian youths and Indian youths from Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India. Data collection was done by conducting in-depth interviews with 40 Malaysian Indian youths at a public university in Malaysia and 30 Indian youths from three university and government colleges in Chennai. The students were selected using purposive sampling method. Youths from both countries perceived that some elements of beauty ideals have evolved in Tamil movies mainly for actresses. Preference for thinness and fairness or whiteness may reflect socio-cultural expectation of the contemporary Indian society. However, youths from both countries have different views when discussing how the beauty ideals in the movies influence their choices and perception about beauty in everyday life. The findings of this study are important in media literacy and intervention program for these youth.

Series:

Anne Grüne and Kai Hafez

Zusammenfassung

The article revisits classical debates about the positive and negative relation of popular culture and socio-political developments with regard to the Arab world. Within the Frankfurt School and modern Cultural Studies at times contradictory approaches to the role of entertainment in political culture are being debated. In Islamic and Middle Eastern Studies rather positive readings of entertainments’ political potential seem to prevail. During the “Arab Spring” the impact of participatory values promoted by both popular culture and the new social media (“entertainment is political”) appeared to be actually tangible. The article discusses the dynamic relation of entertainment television and individualization on a theoretical and empirical level. On the basis of a large body of follow-up discourses of media reception (group discussions) with young Egyptians during the time of the “Arab Spring,” we ask whether contemporary television shows promote both individualization on a cognitive, affective and practical level of experience as well as the appreciation of individualization as a social value. We argue that popular culture reveals tendencies of differentiation and modernization in Arab societies, which are all too often described as “collectivistic.” The case study shows that critical faculty, media literacy and the appreciation of individual articulation can be triggered by entertainment. Moments of “ironic pleasure” and transitions of simulated empathy and stimulated action are discussed.

Noam Peleg

policy can be guided by democratic values of participatory citizenship, rather than acting as a means of promoting neo-liberal market values. The book gathers fourteen articles and is divided into two parts: ‘Media Literacy: Importance and Challenges’ and ‘Young People and the Nordic Digital Media