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Eugene Nida and Charles Taber

The Theory and Practice of Translation, first published in 1982 and a companion work to Toward a Science of Translating (Brill, 1964), analyses and describes the set of processes involved in translating. Bible translating, the focus of this work, offers a unique subject for such a study, as it has an exceptionally long history, involves more than 2,000 languages, a vast range of cultures and a broader range of literary structures than any other type of translating. Not only of interest to Biblical scholars, therefore, this work explores issues of textual meanings and the procedures for communicating these meanings into other languages and cultures.

Two Shipwrecked Gospels

The Logoi of Jesus and Papias’s Exposition of Logia about the Lord

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Dennis R. MacDonald

“Dennis MacDonald is one of the most creative and intellectually innovative New Testament scholars of his generation. In this bold new book, MacDonald dares to re-imagine the textual landscape of early Gospel traditions. Attention is focused on reconstructing two lost Gospel texts, the Logoi of Jesus (the so-called Q source) and Papias’ The Exposition of Logia about the Lord. MacDonald develops a new paradigm for reconstructing Q, and in the process generates a text nearly twice as long as traditional reconstructions. This he calls Q+. In relation to Papias’ Exposition, MacDonald argues that work was a commentary on three gospel texts – Matthew, Mark and the Logoi of Jesus. Here MacDonald seeks to re-assemble the surviving fragments of Papias’ work in their original order and he speculates concerning the material that would have filled the gaps between these fragments. MacDonald’s work is brave, challenging, and stimulating. If his ideas prove correct the implication for New Testament scholarship and current understandings of the transmission of the Jesus tradition would be truly revolutionary.”—Paul Foster, School of Divinity, University of Edinburgh.

L'Exagoge d'Ezéchiel le Tragique

Introduction, texte, traduction et commentaire

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Pierluigi Lanfranchi

The seventeen fragments of the Ezekiel’s Exagoge (between mid-2nd and mid-1st century BCE) relate the story of the first fifteen chapters of the Exodus. They are the only evidence of a Jewish tragedy which has come down to us from Antiquity, as well as the most extensive specimen of a Greek tragedy of the Hellenistic period. For this reason the Exagoge is of unique historical, religious and literary value.
This volume provides a translation and an in-depth commentary of the fragments of the Exagoge. The author deals with philological, dramaturgical and exegetical questions and sheds light on the relation between Ezekiel’s drama and the Greek Bible, Hellenistic Jewish literature and Greek classical models.
The introduction focuses on general subjects: the manifold Jewish attitudes towards theatre, the social and cultural context of the performance of the Exagoge, the dramatisation of the biblical text by Ezekiel, the complicated history of the transmission of the fragments.

Les dix-sept fragments de l’ Exagoge d’Ezéchiel le Tragique (entre la moitié du IIe et la moitié du Ier siècle av.n.è.) racontent l’histoire des quinze premiers chapitres de l’ Exode. Ils sont non seulement le témoignage unique d’une tragédie juive que l’Antiquité nous a transmise, mais aussi le spécimen le plus étendu de tragédie grecque de la période hellénistique. Sa valeur historique, religieuse et littéraire est donc unique.
Ce volume offre une traduction et un commentaire approfondi des fragments de l’ Exagoge. Les problèmes philologiques, dramaturgiques et exégétiques y sont étudiés que les liens de cette pièce avec d’une part le texte biblique et la littérature du Judaïsme hellénistique, d’autre part les modèles des tragédies classiques.
Dans l’introduction des questions générales sont abordées : les différentes attitudes des Juifs à l’égard du théâtre, le contexte social et culturel dans lequel l’ Exagoge a été représentée, la dramatisation du texte biblique opérée par Ezéchiel, l’histoire complexe de la transmission des fragments.

Donald Vance

This grammar introduces undergraduate and graduate students to the essentials of classical Hebrew. It begins with the simple and regular elements of the language and proceeds to the complex and irregular, frequently referencing the historical development of Hebrew. Extensive explanations of elements in English prepare students for the discussion of the corresponding Hebrew element. Through the course of the text, the reader will translate the book of Ruth as well as other biblical and nonbiblical texts, learning particular skills in reading both the entire Hebrew Bible and the later sixth-century Hebrew material, such as the Lachish Letter. Accomplished students of this text will be prepared to progress to advanced study of Hebrew grammar and exegesis of the Hebrew Bible.

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Edited by Virpi Mäkinen

The volume provides new evidence of how the legal ideas of the Lutheran Reformation were put into practice, especially in the Nordic countries, and how they worked in the history of law. Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden forming the largest Lutheran area in the world, this lacuna is considerable.
The first part of the book deals with the legal, theological and philosophical thought of the reformers. The second part examines the impact of the Reformation on particular aspects of legal reform, especially marriage and criminal law and the law on poor relief in the Northern Europe.
The study is based on interdisciplinary research by theologians and legal historians.

Contributors include: Kaarlo Arffman, Pekka Kärkkäinen, Mia Korpiola, Virpi Mäkinen, Heikki Pihlajamäki, Antti Raunio, Risto Saarinen, and Reijo Työrinoja.

Sodom's Sin

Genesis 18-19 and its Interpretations

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Edited by Ed Noort and Tigchelaar

This volume is devoted to the receptions of and reflections on the story of Sodom and Gomorrah as told in Genesis 18 and 19. Two articles discuss intertextual reactions to the Sodom narrative within the Hebrew Bible. Five contributions examine readings and rewritings of the Sodom narrative in early Jewish, Christian and Islamic writings: Jubilees, the Dead Sea Scrolls, the New Testament (Revelation 11), Targumim and early Koran commentaries. Two articles focus on separate themes, the punishment of the Dead Sea and the prohibition on looking back. Finally, two articles that focus on Peter Damian and Proust's Sodome et Gomorrhe I describe the later reception of the sin of Sodom as homosexuality. A bibliography of recent works completes the volume.

The Gospel to the Romans

The Setting and Rhetoric of Mark's Gospel

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Brian Incigneri

This book proposes that Mark's Gospel was written in Rome in late 71 after the return of the feared Titus who had recently destroyed the Jerusalem Temple. Recognising that the use of emotional appeals was a prime contemporary rhetorical tool, it shows the Gospel to be an emotionally-charged text aimed at readers traumatised by years of persecution, fear of arrest and intra-community tensions over the forgiveness of those who had failed. It examines the political, social and religious situation and shows that the Gospel contains allusions to many recent events of concern to Christians. Mark stirs their fears and painful memories to move them to a new resolve, providing a model for them — Jesus, the first martyr for the gospel.

Donald Vance

This grammar introduces undergraduate and graduate students to the essentials of classical Hebrew. It begins with the simple and regular elements of the language and proceeds to the complex and irregular, frequently referencing the historical development of Hebrew. Extensive explanations of elements in English prepare students for the discussion of the corresponding Hebrew element. Through the course of the text, the reader will translate the book of Ruth as well as other biblical and nonbiblical texts, learning particular skills in reading both the entire Hebrew Bible and the later sixth-century Hebrew material, such as the Lachish Letter. Accomplished students of this text will be prepared to progress to advanced study of Hebrew grammar and exegesis of the Hebrew Bible.

Paul's Gospel in Romans

A Discourse Analysis of Rom 1:16-8:39

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Jae Hyun Lee

This book offers a fresh approach to Paul's gospel. Applying linguistic discourse analysis to Romans 1:16-8:39, it helps the reader to gain a comprehensive understanding of the argumentative structure and contents of the gospel of Paul. As well as revealing the two underlying descriptive frameworks that Paul uses to explain his gospel about God's salvation - the interactive framework between God and humans, and the 'two-realm' framework - this book demonstrates that Paul's gospel consists of one 'peak point' that shows the central role of Jesus, and two 'sub-peaks' elucidating salvation.

The Reshaped Mind

Searle, the Biblical Writers, and Christ’s Blood

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Lace Marie Williams-Tinajero

A number of biblical scholars and theologians have had interest in speech act theory ever since J.L. Austin (1911–1960) outlined how a speaker can perform actions with words. John R. Searle has made a significant contribution to speech act theory after Austin by rooting his philosophy of language in the philosophy of mind; however, Searle’s categories remain largely under or misrepresented in theological circles. In this book, the author works exclusively with Searle’s categories to examine five NT texts on the ‘blood-of-Christ’ motif (Rom 3:25; Heb 9:12; John 6:52–59; Rev 1:5b–6; Rev 7:13–14). The main result is a broader understanding of Christ’s blood in a literal sense rather than simply as a metaphor for his death.