Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 115 items for :

  • All: "subject" x
  • Literature & Culture x
Clear All

Journeys of Desire

A Study of the Balinese Text Malat

Series:

A. Vickers

From the late seventeenth century until the Dutch conquest of the early twentieth Century Bali was ruled by a set of competing kingdoms. This study of the Balinese text Kidung Malat is the first work in Indonesian historical studies to analyse the main ideology of these Balinese kingdoms. It does so by demonstrating how the performance and presentation of the text presented an image of the ideal prince to both rulers and subjects.
The Kidung Malat exemplifies courtly ideology through its descriptions of the adventures of kings and princes from the era of the medieval kingdoms of East Java. It is one of the longest and most complex of a set of narratives called Pañji stories, which originated in East Java and spread throughout Southeast Asia. This book is also the first extensive historical analysis of a Pañji story, combining textual analysis with the study of the gambuh dance-drama in which the Malat is performed, and comparing these forms with paintings and other manifestations of the text.

The Other Kang Youwei

Calligrapher, Art Activist, and Aesthetic Reformer in Modern China

Series:

Aida Yuen Wong

The Other Kang Youwei is the first in-depth study of the art historical importance of Kang Youwei (1858-1927). The most prominent constitutional monarchist who served as Emperor Guangxu’s advisor during the Hundred Days Reform of 1898, he has been discussed in previous scholarship largely as a political figure. Less well known are his achievements in calligraphy and calligraphy theory (he wrote the most comprehensive and widely-read guide to the Stele School in his day), as well as his efforts in making art a powerful instrument for national transformation. He advocated East-West synthesis, especially the adoption of Renaissance plasticity and Song Dynasty-style verisimilitude. This book evaluates his extensive and controversial impact on pictorial realism in a variety of genres: human figures, horses, landscapes, and bird-and-flower subjects (the last developing in close step with Japanese trends). Besides providing an objective assessment of his legacy in the art world, The Other Kang Youwei offers a rare integrated treatment of Chinese calligraphy, painting, and art theory of the twentieth century.

Shan'ge, the 'Mountain Songs'

Love Songs in Ming China

Series:

Yasushi OKI and Paolo Santangelo

Mountain Songs is a collection of folk songs edited by the famous writer Feng Menglong (1574-1646). By this innovative work - mainly written in the Suzhou dialect - he aimed to revitalize poetry through the power of popular songs. This collection is very significant to the understanding of the characters of the mobile society of Jiangnan and the vitality of its intellectual world. The songs deal with the lives of common people: women, often prostitutes, boatmen, peasants, hunters, fishers and paddlers. Their spirit is far from the orthodox moral intents that Zhu Xi advocated for interpreting the Shijing, and their language is often vulgar and full of crude expressions or salacious double meanings and contains allusions to sexual and erotic behaviour.

Series:

David Holm and Meng Yuanyao

Series:

Edited by Sarah Queen and Michael Puett

The Han dynasty Huainanzi is a compendium of knowledge covering every subject from self-cultivation, astronomy, and calendrics, to the arts of government. This edited volume follows a multi-disciplinary approach to explore how and why the Huainanzi was produced and how we should interpret the work. The volume should be of interest to scholars of early China, as well as scholars of textual production in other periods of Chinese history and in other cultures.
With contributions by Anne Behnke Kinney, Martin Kern, John S. Major, Andrew Meyer, Judson B. Murray, Michael Nylan, David W. Pankenier, Michael Puett, Sarah A. Queen, Harold D. Roth, and Griet Vankeerberghen.

The Rhetoric of Photography in Modern Japanese Literature

Materiality in the Visual Register as Narrated by Tanizaki Jun’ichirō, Abe Kōbō, Horie Toshiyuki and Kanai Mieko

Series:

Atsuko Sakaki

In The Rhetoric of Photography in Modern Japanese Literature, Atsuko Sakaki closely examines photography-inspired texts by four Japanese novelists: Tanizaki Jun’ichirō (1886-1965), Abe Kōbō (1924-93), Horie Toshiyuki (b. 1964) and Kanai Mieko (b. 1947). As connoisseurs, practitioners or critics of this visual medium, these authors look beyond photographs’ status as images that document and verify empirical incidents and existences, articulating instead the physical process of photographic production and photographs’ material presence in human lives. This book offers insight into the engagement with photography in Japanese literary texts as a means of bringing forgotten subject-object dynamics to light. It calls for a fundamental reconfiguration of the parameters of modern print culture and its presumption of the transparency of agents of representation.

Arthur Cooper

Edited by Imre Galambos

quite natural and obvious to the Greeks when producing a dictionary of their own language, unless it is a specialised dictionary of modern spoken or ‘Demotic’ Greek only, or of Homer or some other specialised subject, to include all Greek in it. Before me for instance is a dictionary published in

Arthur Cooper

Edited by Imre Galambos

disjunctive ; not quite like our notions of a subject being linked to the verb, and the verb to an object. “ A Balbus (& Co.) Built Wall”, however, can when necessary, be distinguished from this sentence by giving warning of the coming conjunction of an object, that is, an object in Chinese grammatical

Arthur Cooper

Edited by Imre Galambos

politics and other such subjects proper to poets, have reservations about his work in general. His youth was undoubtedly wild, and in it he played the part of what is variously translated ‘knight-errant’ and, rather more appropriately, ‘roving brave’. ‘Condottiere’ might also convey the meaning. He duelled

Arthur Cooper

Edited by Imre Galambos

be kept out and subjects of the Empire to be kept at home (these were always, as much as direct defence, the purposes of the Great Wall); lest China’s superior technology got into the wrong hands. In such a state of confidence it was natural for the Ch’ien Lung Emperor (1736–1796) to regard Lord