Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 14 items for :

  • Drama & Theatre Studies x
Clear All
Opera was a prominent political forum and a potent force for nineteenth-century nationalism. As one of the most popular forms of entertainment, opera could mobilize large crowds and became the locus of ideological debates about nation-building. Despite its crucial role in national movements, opera has received little attention in the context of nationalism. In Staging the Nation: Opera and Nationalism in 19th-Century Hungary, Krisztina Lajosi examines the development of Hungarian national thought by exploring the theatrical and operatic practices that have shaped historical consciousness. Lajosi combines cultural history, political thought, and the history of music theater, and highlights the role of the opera composer Ferenc Erkel (1810-1893) in institutionalizing national opera and turning opera-loving audiences into a national public.
In A Companion to Celestina, Enrique Fernandez brings together twenty-three hitherto unpublished contributions on the Tragicomedia de Calisto y Melibea, popularly known as Celestina (c. 1499) written by leading experts who summarize, evaluate and expand on previous studies. The resulting chapters offer the non-specialist an overview of Celestina studies. Those who already know the field will find state of the art studies filled with new insights that elaborate on or depart from the well-established currents of criticism. Celestina's creation and sources, the parody of religious and erudite traditions, the treatment of magic, prostitution, the celestinesca and picaresque genre, the translations into other languages as well as the adaptations into the visual arts (engravings, paintings, films) are some of the topics included in this companion.

Contributors are: Beatriz de Alba-Koch, Raúl Álvarez Moreno, Consolación Baranda, Ted L. Bergman, Patrizia Botta, José Luis Canet, Fernando Cantalapiedra, Ricardo Castells, Ivy Corfis, Manuel da Costa Fontes, Enrique Fernandez, José Luis Gastañaga Ponce de León, Ryan D. Giles, Yolanda Iglesias, Gustavo Illades Aguiar, Kathleen V. Kish, Bienvenido Morros Mestres, Devid Paolini, Antonio Pérez Romero, Amaranta Saguar García, Connie Scarborough, Joseph T. Snow, and Enriqueta Zafra.

our mind has been gently pierced by the plaintive charm of his divine voice! It looks like I see a half-dead Woman sweating martyrs’ blood, a living dead who is carried away by grief and that keeps Hell at her side. When red with rage he rudely displays the cruelties of the

In: Daniel Heinsius, Auriacus, sive Libertas saucia (Orange, or Liberty Wounded), 1602

interpretations: (1) speaks with a thundering voice ( OLD s.v. 3), or, more likely, (2) issues a ban (which was also called a banishing lightning, WNT 2, 951). Libertas (Freedom) 121–134 Vidésne?—caeso parente In Aur . V , 2 (ll. 1912–2105) wounded Liberty speaks her lamentation. She has cut her hair and

In: Daniel Heinsius, Auriacus, sive Libertas saucia (Orange, or Liberty Wounded), 1602

the Prince of blessed memory came down to have lunch, and approaching the same Prince, he asked him for a passport, which he asked (as my Lady the Princess very well noticed) with a trembling voice and being afraid, so that the Lady asked my Lord the Prince who he was, and said that he had an evil

In: Daniel Heinsius, Auriacus, sive Libertas saucia (Orange, or Liberty Wounded), 1602
Thought, Form, and Performance of Revolt
Marie Vieux Chauvet’s Theatres: Thought, Form, and Performance of Revolt at once reflects and acts upon the praxis of theatre that inspired Haitian writer Marie Vieux Chauvet, while at the same time provides incisively new cultural studies readings about revolt in her theatre and prose. Chauvet – like many free-minded women of the Caribbean and the African diaspora – was banned from the public sphere, leaving her work largely ignored for decades. Following on a renewed interest in Chauvet, this collection makes essential contributions to Africana Studies, Theatre Studies, Performance Studies, Postcolonial Studies, and Global South Feminisms.

Contributors are: Alessandra Benedicty-Kokken, Stéphanie Bérard, Christian Flaugh, Gabrielle Gallo, Jeremy Matthew Glick, Kaiama L. Glover, Régine Michelle Jean-Charles, Cae Joseph-Massena, Nehanda Loiseau, Judith G. Miller, Lizabeth Paravisini-Gebert, Anthony Phelps, Ioana Pribiag, Charlee M. Redman Bezilla, Guy Régis Jr, and Lena Taub Robles.

This collection is a beautiful gathering of voices exploring Chauvet’s theatrical work, along with the role of theatre in her novels. The richly textured and evocatively written essays offer many new and necessary insights into the work of one of Haiti’s greatest writers.
— Laurent Dubois, Marcello Lotti Professor of Romance Studies and History, Duke University. Author of Haiti: The Aftershocks of History

This collection draws necessary critical attention to how theatre and performance animate the work of a key figure in Caribbean fiction and drama. Using an innovative scholarly and artistic approach, the collection incorporates leading and new voices in Haitian studies and Francophone studies on Chauvet’s depictions of revolt.
— Soyica Diggs Colbert, Professor of African American Studies and Theater & Performance Studies, Georgetown University. Author of Black Movements: Performance and Cultural Politics
In: The Reception of Aeschylus’ Plays through Shifting Models and Frontiers
Comedy, Tragedy and the Polis in 5th Century Athens
Despite the many studies of Greek comedy and tragedy separately, scholarship has generally neglected the relation of the two. And yet the genres developed together, were performed together, and influenced each other to the extent of becoming polar opposites. In Aristophanes and His Tragic Muse, Stephanie Nelson considers this opposition through an analysis of how the genres developed, by looking at the tragic and comic elements in satyr drama, and by contrasting specific Aristophanes plays with tragedies on similar themes, such as the individual, the polis, and the gods. The study reveals that tragedy’s focus on necessity and a quest for meaning complements a neglected but critical element in Athenian comedy: its interest in freedom, and the ambivalence of its incompatible visions of reality.

light .” 49 In this way, any remaining glimpse of Woman’s identity as either/both actress and character is eventually negated. Woman does definitely not exist as an independent subject but rather as a stage prop, with neither voice nor agency of her own, like Man before her. Throughout the play, Woman

In: Dionysus on the Other Shore

subconscious level, and may be derived from the relationship between character and cosmos. The tragic that inheres in material existence and that literature gives voice to, is, in Gao’s own words, less of a personal vision than of a condition ; a truth that the author limits himself to acknowledge as manifest

In: Dionysus on the Other Shore