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Mentoring Students of Color

Naming the Politics of Race, Social Class, Gender, and Power

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Edited by Juan F. Carrillo, Danielle Parker Moore and Timothy Condor

As more students of color continue to make up our nation’s schools, finding ways to address their academic and cultural ways knowing become important issues. This book explores these intersections, by covering a variety of topics related to race, social class, and gender, all within a multiyear study of a mentoring program that is situated within U.S. K-12 schools. Furthermore, the role of power is central to the analyses as the contributors examine questions, tensions, and posit overall critical takes on mentoring. Finally, suggestions for designing critical and holistic programming are provided.

Contributors are: Shanyce L. Campbell, Juan F. Carrillo, Tim Conder, Dana Griffin, Alison LaGarry, George Noblit, Danielle Parker Moore, Esmeralda Rodriguez, and Amy Senta.
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PISA and Global Education Policy

Understanding Finland’s Success and Influence

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Jennifer Chung

PISA and Global Education Policy: Understanding Finland's Success and Influence provides an in-depth investigation for the reasons behind Finland’s success in the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA). Finland’s high performances in every administration of PISA since 2000 have captured worldwide attention. This volume offers a comprehensive exploration into the context of Finland, uncovering its historical, cultural, political, and societal nuances. Furthermore, it delves into the history of Finnish education, providing a strong foundation from which to view the system that produced so much success in PISA. The book analyses empirical data from Finnish professors of education, ministers of education, head teachers, and teachers for the reasons behind Finland’s consistently high outcomes in the survey. It includes viewpoints from OECD officers with direct responsibility for PISA. In addition, it uncovers the impact of Finnish influence on education policy worldwide. Thus, the text presents an analysis of the growing politicisation of international achievement studies such as PISA. The increasingly globalised educational context surrounding PISA calls for an analysis of policy transfer and the already-apparent uncritical policy borrowing of Finnish education policy within the UK context.
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STEM Education 2.0

Myths and Truths – What Has K-12 STEM Education Research Taught Us?

Edited by Alpaslan Sahin and Margaret J. Mohr-Schroeder

STEM Education 2.0 discusses the most recent research on important selected K-12 STEM topics by synthesizing previous research and offering new research questions. The contributions range from analysis of key STEM issues that have been studied for more than two decades to topics that have more recently became popular, such as maker space and robotics. In each chapter, nationally and internationally known STEM experts review key literature in the field, share findings of their own research with its implications for K-12 STEM education, and finally offer future research areas and questions in the respected area they have been studying. This volume provides diverse and leading voices in the future of STEM education and STEM education research.
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Edited by Linda Ware and Roger Slee

Ellen A. Brantlinger: When Meanings Falter and Words Fail, Ideology Matters celebrates the work of and is dedicated to the memory of Ellen A. Brantlinger, a scholar-activist who spent most of her professional career as a professor of special education at Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana in the United States of America. Ellen was recognized internationally as an educator and critical theorist and celebrated for her incisive and unyielding critique of special education research, policy, and practice that spanned several decades. Brantlinger held that the impoverished nature of special education theory and practice was rooted to conformance with the most rigid constructs of standardization, normalcy, and its resulting inequitable outcomes for children with disabilities. When the push for educational inclusion gained currency in some quarters in the United States (mid-1980s), Brantlinger was among a handful of scholars who identified special education as the major obstacle to the inclusion of disabled students in the educational system. She was widely published in North American journals well known in special education, teacher education, multicultural education, sociology of education, urban education, school counseling, curriculum theory, qualitative education, and feminist teaching. This book offers an elaboration of the scholarly contributions made by Ellen Brantlinger to research in education, special education, inclusive education, and the early development of Disability Studies in Education. Many of its contributors move between the paradigmatic locations of special education, inclusive education, and disability studies as they consider Ellen’s influence.

Contributors are: Julie Allan, Subini A. Annamma, Jessica Bacon, Amy L. Boelé, Alicia A. Broderick, Kathleen M. Collins, David J. Connor, Dianne L. Ferguson, Philip M. Ferguson, Beth Ferri, Joanne Kim, Janette Klingner, Corrine Li, Brooke A. Moore, Emily A. Nusbaum, and Janet S. Sauer.
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Engaging Learners with Semiotics

Lessons Learned from Reading the Signs

Ruth Gannon-Cook and Kathryn Ley

Semiotics has explained the cognitive mechanisms of a complex, subtle and important phenomenon affecting all human interactions and communications across socio-cultural, socio-economic groups. Semiotics has captured a durable and enriching functionality from multiple disciplines including psychology, anthropology, sociology, philosophy, marketing and their multidisciplinary off-spring, such as, educational psychology, consumer psychology, visual literacy, media studies, etc. Semiotic treatises have explored critical factors affecting the relationship between any intended message and the message recipient’s interpretation. The factors that shape interpretation inherently affect learning and often directly affect learner engagement with the content. Learning environments have been a culturally-laden communication experience which academics, largely segmented by discipline, have described but often cloaked in semiotic jargon. Each chapter has integrated example after example of semiotics in everyday activities and events, such as stories, graphics, movies, games, infographics, and educational strategies. Each chapter has presented the most salient semiotic features for learning environments. The book has described semiotics as a communications phenomenon with practical implications for educators to enhance courses and programs with semiotic features in any educational environment but especially in mediated e-learning environments.
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Edited by Charles L. Lowery and Patrick M. Jenlink

In the last twenty-five years there has been a great deal of scholarship about John Dewey’s work, as well as continued appraisal of his relevance for our time, especially in his contributions to pragmatism and progressivism in teaching, learning, and school learning. The Handbook of Dewey’s Theory and Practice in Education provides a comprehensive, accessible, richly theoretical yet practical guide to the educational theories, ideals, and pragmatic implications of the work of John Dewey, America’s preeminent philosopher of education. Edited by a multidisciplinary team with a wide range of perspectives and experience, this volume will serve as a state-of-the-art reference to the hugely consequential implications of Dewey’s work for education and schooling in the 21st century. Organized around a series of concentric circles ranging from the purposes of education to appropriate policies, principles of schooling at the organizational and administrative level, and pedagogical practice in Deweyan classrooms, the chapters will connect Dewey’s theoretical ideas to their pragmatic implications.
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Edited by Juanjo Mena, Ana García-Valcárcel and Francisco J. García-Peñalvo

The essence of this book is to capture the nature of current educational practices from a variety of theoretical perspectives. Both teachers and teacher educators provide a lens on better understanding teacher training and learning processes. The mutual interrelations and provision of knowledge between the academia and schools are essential to combine discourses and align positions. Therefore, bringing practice into theory and theory to practice in nowadays teaching is key to offer adapted responses to multiple problems and increasingly diverse contexts. On the other hand, the array of studies from around the world compiled in this volume allow the readership to find commonplaces, draw shared concerns, and define goals. Studying teaching and teacher education across-contexts allow to gauge the pulse of the discipline and identify those issues that enable educators to understand the complexities of teaching and learning. The chapters examine the development of knowledge and understanding of teaching practices, analyze engaging learning environments, the sustainability of learning and teaching practices, and show new practices based on the use of Information and Communication Technologies. The diverse teaching contexts from this compilation of international research are organized according to the following themes:
• Teaching professional learning and knowledge;
• Teacher beliefs and reflective thinking;
• Innovative teacher procedures.

Contributors are: Laura Sara Agrati, Dyann Barras, Benignus Bitu, Robyn Brandenburg, Heather Braund, Michael Sean Cavanagh, Chiou-hui Chou, Jean Clandinin, Leah L. Echiverri, Maria Flores, María García, Francisco García-Peñalvo, Ana García-Valcárcel, Stephen Geofroy, Raquel Gómez, Verónica B. Gómez-Pablos, Jenna Granados, Hafdís Guðjónsdóttir, Jukka Husu, Jóhanna Karlsdóttir, Keith Lane, Celina Lay, Samuel Lochan, Marta Martín-del-Pozo, Ella Mazor, Sharon M. McDonough, Lennox McLeod, Juanjo Mena, Wendy Moran, Brian R. Mundy, Lily Orland-Barak, Edda Óskarsdóttir, Samuel O. Oyoo, Stefinee Pinnegar, Eleftherios Soleas, Lystra Stephens-James, Linda Turner, Antoinette Valentine Lewis, and Sarah Witt.
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The field of education in the 21st century is broad in scope and is multidisciplinary. To help scholars and students understand the various disciplines that comprise the field of education, the editors view the various fields as texts to be historicized and explicated. Each field is a discipline with its own scholars, language, and research.

The various reference works will present comprehensive and accurate portraits of the various disciplines. What readers will encounter in these reference works is what the various fields are saying, and/or have been saying during their various histories. This can open up conversations among current established scholars and future, next generation scholars nationally and internationally. These complicated conversations would further expand the various fields and lead to possibilities for praxis. Praxis emphasizes the increase of critical knowledge and understandings both for self-development and social reconstruction.

There is a uniqueness in Critical Understanding in Education in the commitment to the focus on the historical development and comprehensive critical presentation of a particular discipline.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts by e-mail to Assistant Editor Evelien van der Veer.
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Edited by Anila Zainub

Decolonization and Anti-colonial Praxis presents research on contemporary forms of decolonization and anti-colonialism in practice. It pertains to the ways in which individuals, groups, and communities engage with the logic of epistemic colonial power within areas of citizenship, migration, education, Indigeneity, language, land struggle, and social work. The contributions in this edited volume empirically document the conceptual and bodily engagement of racialized and violated individuals and communities as they use anti-colonial principles to disrupt criminalizing institutional discourses and policies within various global imperial contexts.

The terms ‘Decolonization’ and ‘Anti-colonialism’ are used in diverse and interdisciplinary academic perspectives. They are researched upon and elaborated in necessary ways in the theoretical literature, however, it is rare to see these principles employed in applied forms. Decolonization and Anti-colonial Praxis provides a much needed contemporary and representative reclamation of these concepts from the standpoint of racialized communities. It explores the frameworks and methods rooted in their indigeneity, cultural history and memories to imagine a new future. The research findings and methodological tools presented in this book will be of interdisciplinary interest to teachers, graduate students and researchers.

Contributors are: Harriet Akanmori, Ayah Al Oballi, Sevgi Arslan, Jacqueline Benn-John, Lucy El-Sherif, Danielle Freitas, Pablo Isla Monsalve, Dionisio Nyaga, Hoda Samater, Rose Ann Torres, Umar Umangay, and Anila Zainub. 
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Edited by Jody L. McBrien

Since 2014, the international community has felt overwhelmed by refugees and asylum seekers searching for opportunities in which to rebuild their lives. Indeed, large numbers can result in turmoil and concern in resettlement countries and with national citizens. A climate of fear can result, especially if perpetuated by politicians and media that suggest negative effects resulting from immigration.

Caught in the crossfire of social and political disagreements about migration are children, most of whom are not included in decisions to leave their homelands. This edited book examines their academic challenges from the perspective of the six English-speaking refugee resettlement countries. Our hope is not only to compare challenges, but also to describe successes by which teachers and policymakers can consider new approaches to help refugee and asylum-seeking children.

Educational Policies and Practices of English-Speaking Refugee Resettlement Countries offers perspectives from established and new scholars examining educational situations for refugees and asylum seekers. The top three resettlement countries are the United States, Canada, and Australia. For its size, New Zealand is also proportionately a country of high resettlement. New to resettlement are the United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland. Thus, this collection includes wisdom from countries that began resettlement during World War Two as well as newcomers to the process. In 2018, UNHCR numbers of displaced people reached a record high of 68.5 million. Policymakers, teachers, social service providers, and the general public need to understand ways to help resettled refugees become productive members in their new countries of residence.

Contributors are: Samantha Arnold, Asih Asikin-Garmager, Melanie Baak, Sally Baker, Zhiyan Basharati, Briana Byers, Merike Darmody, Lucia Dore, Ain A. Grooms, Maria Hayward, Asher Hirsch, Amanda Hiorth, Caroline Lenette, Leslie Ann Locke, Duhita Mahatmya, Jody L. McBrien, Rory Mc Daid, Helen Murphy, Tara Ross, Jan Stewart, and Elizabeth P. Tonogbanua.