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Nordic Voices

Teaching and Researching Comparative and International Education in the Nordic Countries

Series:

Edited by Halla B. Holmarsdottir and Mina O'Dowd

This volume represents the work of sixteen authors, who all work at different universities and other academic institutions in the Nordic countries. It provides insight into the diversity of research being conducted in the northernmost parts of Europe. Although it would be incorrect to assert that research in this far away part of Europe represents something drastically different than that done in other parts of the world, it would be equally incorrect to maintain that being at the outskirts, on the cusp, or on the periphery _ whichever way one wishes to describe the position of the Nordic countries in relation to the rest of the world—does not influence the ways in which educational processes, phenomena and their consequences are viewed.
These sixteen Nordic Voices discuss with readers different issues regarding teaching and researching Comparative and International Education in the Nordic countries. The editors began their collaboration in 2006, working together to revitalize the Nordic Comparative and International Education Society. NOCIES was officially re-established in May, 2008.
Halla B. Holmarsdottir, who is from Iceland, lives and works in Norway, where she is Associate Professor in Multicultural and International Education at Oslo University College.
Mina O’Dowd, whose father is from the USA and mother is Norwegian, lives and works in Sweden. Nordic Voices: Teaching and Researching Comparative and International Education in the Nordic Countries is a result of the collaboration that began over three years ago.

Student Voice

A Companion to ""Democracy and Its Discontents""

Edited by Karyn Cooper and Sardar M. Anwaruddin

Student Voice: A Companion to Democracy and Its Discontents serves two primary purposes. First, as the title of the volume suggests, it serves as a companion text to Democracy and Its Discontents: Critical Literacy across Global Contexts (Sense Publishers, 2015). Second, the volume features critical dialogues between emerging and established scholars in the field of critical literacy education, broadly defined. It brings together a collection of essays that speak to the possibilities of taking a critical approach to language and literacy education. The contributing authors draw on their life stories and professional experiences to make a strong case for taking a critical approach to education. They demonstrate that the act of teaching always involves a grappling with the entanglement of social, cultural and political forces. In this sense, education is always a normative and ethical enterprise. The authors featured in this book will encourage readers to re-imagine critical education and its emancipatory potential in an age of neo-conservative and corporate assaults on education.
Karyn Cooper is an Associate Professor and Sardar M. Anwaruddin is a PhD candidate in the Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learning at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) of the University of Toronto.
New Research – New Voices involves two strands, leaving open the possibility of others as the series grows:
Strand 1: New Voices and New Knowledge in Research Methodology
This strand in the book series is dedicated to producing cutting-edge titles focusing on Research Methodology. While it might be generally acknowledged that educational researchers often tend to import methods developed in neighboring disciplines, this is not always acknowledged in the literature on methodology. This series intends to contribute to the knowledge foundation in educational research by specifically seeking out those who work both across disciplines and inter-disciplinary in terms of their methodological approaches. The overall focus is to develop a series focusing on those methods which are appropriate in dealing with the specific research problems of the discipline.
The series provides students and scholars with state-of-the-art scholarship on methodology, methods and techniques focusing on a range of research topics. It comprises innovative and intellectually rigorous monographs and edited collections which bridge schools of thought and cross the boundaries of conventional approaches. The series covers a broad range of issues focusing on not only empirical-analytical and interpretive approaches, but moreover on micro and macro studies, and quantitative and qualitative methods.
Strand 2: New Voices and New Knowledge in Educational Research
This part of the series will focus on theoretical and empirical contributions that are unique and will provide important insights into the field of educational research across a range of contexts globally. This part of the series will collectively communicate new voices, new insights and new possibilities within the field of educational research. In particular the focus will be on scholars, students and communities that have often been excluded or marginalized within educational research and practice.

Buddhist Voices in School

How a Community Created a Buddhist Education Program for State Schools

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Sue Erica Smith

There are 400 million Buddhists in the world. Buddhists in Australia make up 3% of the population. So why have Buddhists had so little to say about educating youth? And, can Buddhism survive in Australia without educating youth?
Sue Smith in Buddhist Voices in School answers why Buddhists are reluctant to ‘go public’ on education, and how Buddhism has much to offer the critical area of enhancing the wellbeing of young people. Here she distinguishes spiritual education from religion.
Using case studies of Buddhist classes in primary schools, Smith shows how a community adapted Buddha-Dharma to fit with contemporary education. The book describes how Social and Emotional Learning, inquiry and experiential approaches to education fit well with the intentions of Buddhism.
In these classes students learned to meditate and explored ethics through a lively selection of Jataka tales. Voices from a Buddhist community, state school teachers, parents and also students inform the narrative of this book. It is the students themselves that reveal over time how they have developed calm, focus, kindness, resilience and better ability to make choices through their participation.
The author concludes that the principles and techniques used in this program make potent contributions to current pedagogy. This book will be of great value to educators, academics and all those who have interest in Buddhism and who care about how children are educated.

Revitalizing Minority Voices

Language Issues in the New Millennium

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Edited by Renée DePalma, Diane Brook Napier and Willibroad Dze-Ngwa

Whose voices are taken into account in language policy and planning and whose have been ignored or more actively silenced? This is the central question addressed in this book. What are the political and social factors that have helped to create these historical exclusions, in terms of endangerment and loss of traditional languages? What are the global influences on the local landscape of languages and linguistic rights? What are the implications for cultural heritage and identity? In analyzing these questions and reporting on research in an array of countries, the chapter authors also suggest ways forward toward designing more inclusive policies and practices in educational contexts, whether in the context of obligatory schooling or in less formal educational contexts.
UNESCO estimates that at least 43% of the estimated 6000 languages spoken in the world are endangered. Such statistics remind us that the linguistic diversity that characterizes the human condition is a fragile thing, and that certain languages need to be cultivated if they are to survive into the 21st century and beyond. The chapters in this volume originated as presentations at the XV World Congress of Comparative Education Societies (Buenos Aires, Argentina, 2013). They represent several global regions, namely Africa, Asia, Europe, and North America. They provide analyses of language policy and politics at the local, regional, national and transnational levels, grass-roots linguistic revitalization initiatives, and the attitudes of minority and majority speakers toward minoritized languages and cultures and towards intercultural and multilingual education programs.

Voices of Resilience

Stigma, Discrimination and Marginalisation of Indian Women Living with HIV/AIDS

Pam O'Connor and Jaya Earnest

This book presents the results of a study that examined the multiple layers of stigma and discrimination experienced by women infected and affected by HIV/AIDS in a low socio-economic area of Mumbai, India. Using exploratory qualitative methods and underpinned by the psychosocial framework and gendered perspectives the study attempts to represent the voices of affected and infected women. The book first focuses on a global overview of HIV, presents data on the Indian context and provides a synthesis of HIV in relation to stigma, discrimination and gender. The second part of the book probes the depth of impact on women’s lives using the lenses of gender, economic status, the environment and physical health. The framework was further modified and extended to include threats revealed by and strengths indentified in infected and affected women. The analysis revealed that strategies to address stigma and discrimination need to address the social, cultural, religious and systemic barriers to changing attitudes. The book portrays the resilience of each woman’s spirit and the unique capacity of the women to cope, to find strength, to pursue life and to maintain hope when their dreams and the dreams of their children have been shattered through HIV/AIDS.

Voices from the Classroom

Elementary Teachers' Experience with Argument-Based Inquiry

Edited by Brian M. Hand and Lori Norton-Meier

There is much attention currently being given to argument-based inquiry in national and state curriculum documents. Students are being required to be able to generate and evaluate science knowledge, and to think critically and judge the value of evidence and explanations. The intent of the book is to provide a rich and broad view of the impact of argument-based inquiry in the elementary classrooms from the perspective of the teacher. All the teachers and professional development authors were engaged in promoting and using argument based inquiry as the approach to teaching science. They were implementing the Science Writing Heuristic (SWH) approach as the argument based approach for classroom practice.
As researchers we constantly work to present our views of these experiences with the voice of the teachers only being relayed through the perspective of the researcher. The intent of this book is to provide an opportunity for us as a community to listen to what the teachers are telling us. Importantly as demands are being placed on classroom experiences that provide opportunities for students to pose questions, make claims, and provide evidence, that is, to think critically and reason like scientists, we need to understand what this looks like from the perspective of the teacher. This book brings together a range of elementary teachers from kindergarten through to year 6 who have used the Science Writing Heuristic approach to teach argument-based inquiry. These teachers have all gone through professional development programs and successfully implemented the approach at a high level.

Muslim Voices in School

Narratives of Identity and Pluralism

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Edited by Özlem Sensoy and Christopher Darius Stonebanks

This book is a collection of readable, accessible, compelling, varied, voiced, passionate, real, textured, multi-faceted, hybrid, fearless, fearful, cautious, bold, modest, and inspired accounts of living Islam in relation to mainstream schooling in the West.
The book helps to make the diverse experiences of Muslim students (from elementary through university, student through professor) both contextual and complex. The politics and education about Islam, Muslims, Arabs, Turks, Iranians and all that is associated with the West’s popular imagination of the monolithic “Middle-East” has long been framed within problematics. The goal of this book is to push back against the reductive mainstream narratives told about Muslim and Middle Eastern heritage students for generations if not centuries, in mainstream schools. The chapters are each authored by Muslim-acculturated scholars.
This book will be of interest to teachers, administrators, students and scholars. As well, the content is suited to fields of study including ethnic studies, critical multicultural education, anti-oppression approaches to education, curriculum studies, social issues in education, social contexts of education, and qualitative research in education.
WINNER! of the National Association for Multicultural Education’s 2010 Philip C. Chinn book award!

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Lisa M. Dembouski

had to work more with my interpreters about the signs or fingerspelling to use with STEM vocabulary and concepts. There was no consistency; I often would see interpreters on the same team sign the terms differently. I also got tired of interpreters voicing wrong for me, of not knowing the vocabulary

Voices From the Margins

School Experiences of Indigenous, Refugee and Migrant Children

Edited by Eva Alerby and Jill Brown

Equitable access to education is fundamental to any concept of social justice offering as it does the means of escape from social and economic marginalisation. Despite this, in too many countries around the world groups of children are systematically denied access to education which will equip them for meaningful participation in the society in which they live. Their needs are ignored and their voices are silenced. They are locked into the position of ‘marginalised other’, the perpetual stranger in society. This collection of studies by an international group of researchers provides a place for migrant, refugee and indigenous children to talk about their school experiences. Refugee children from the Sudan, Afghanistan and Somalia, indigenous children from Sweden, Australia, New Zealand and Vietnam, migrant children in Canada, Iceland and Hong Kong, urban and rural children from Zanzibar all speak out through drawings, small group and individual discussion. For some children their school experiences are positive ones in which systems and teachers work together to meet their needs. For others their experiences are of racism, isolation, inadequately equipped and poorly funded schools, unsympathetic teachers and education systems designed to cater for majority groups. Despite these differences all the children remain enthusiastic about school. They are, in the words of a boy from Afghanistan, ‘thirsty to learn’. The children and the researchers all argue for education as a means to redress, rather than perpetuate, disadvantage. A vital first step in this process is to hear what is being said by those most affected by current practices. The narratives in this text offer a chance to do just that.
Cover photo: Marginalized, Gustav Alerby, Rosvik, Sweden?