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Gloss' (p. 122-123) and a bibliography (p. 124-131), with an indica- tion of English translations of the sources, and suggestions for further reading, with i.a. a section on 'Canon Law and Protestantism'. All these things may have some use for begin- ners. There are, of course, some flaws. For example

In: Tijdschrift voor Rechtsgeschiedenis / Revue d'Histoire du Droit / The Legal History Review

schriftelijke nalatenschap van de andere reclasserings- instellingen die tot 1975 hebben bestaan, zoals de PCRV (protestants), de KRV (katholiek), de dr. F.S. Meijersvereniging (voor reclassenten met psychiatrische indicatie) en de ver- eniging waarin al deze instellingen van 1912 tot 1988 hebben samengewerkt

In: Tijdschrift voor Rechtsgeschiedenis / Revue d'Histoire du Droit / The Legal History Review

thinkers with whom Luzac disputed. This has led to a certain fluidity in the term 'Enlightenment', and even to suggestions that the term is virtually meaningless. Vele- ma argues that there was a 'moderate' Enlightenment, that was 'rational, tolerant, and liberal Protestant' (p. 3). He also sees this

In: Tijdschrift voor Rechtsgeschiedenis / Revue d'Histoire du Droit / The Legal History Review

mention L Band devant Die Katholische Kirche a 6t6 omise dans le titre. En effet 1'espoir de voir paraitre un volume II: Die evangelische Kirche a disparu, la tdche s'av6rant trop lourde pour l'auteur. D'autres espoirs, de voir un volume consacre au droit eccl6siastique protestant (par J. Heckel) et un

In: Tijdschrift voor Rechtsgeschiedenis / Revue d'Histoire du Droit / The Legal History Review

) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 , 412 Canadian State Trials, I (1996) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 , 562 –––, II (2002) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 , 481 Canon law in Protestant lands

In: Tijdschrift voor Rechtsgeschiedenis / Revue d'Histoire du Droit / The Legal History Review

Catholic and Reformed blocs: states with a Protestant ruling class (such as England, several German principalities and soon the Dutch Republic) rejected the political and religious authority of the Pope as a matter of principle, and thus found yet another reason for radically opposing universal monarchy

In: The 1713 Peace of Utrecht and its Enduring Effects

, Sweden, the Swiss Confederation, Tuscany, Bavaria, Venice, Geneva, Lorraine, Cologne, the Palatinate, Modena, the Protestant Swiss Cantons, and many lesser principalities. A total number of 83 plenipotentiaries arrived in Utrecht. The chief negotiators were the Marquis d’Huxelles, the Abbé Polignac and

In: The 1713 Peace of Utrecht and its Enduring Effects

Spanish Indies. 17 Lastly, the British demanded recognition from Louis xiv of the ‘Protestant Succession’ devolving from William (1689–1702) and Mary (1689–1694) over Mary’s sister Queen Anne (1702–1714) to the electoral house of Hanover, as it had been established by the Act of Settlement (1701) as

In: The 1713 Peace of Utrecht and its Enduring Effects

the transition to a balance of power potentially operating more according to the logic of commerce than the logic of conquest. The balance of power was not the invention of the Protestant alliance that had safeguarded the liberty of Europe against Louis xiv ’s attempt to follow in the footsteps of

In: The 1713 Peace of Utrecht and its Enduring Effects