Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 6 of 6 items for :

  • All: Protestants x
  • Brill | Nijhoff x
  • Status (Books): Published x
Clear All

Edited by Tim Allen and John Eade

This book critiques the concepts of cultural functionalism and biologised ethnicity. The chapters examine ethnicities in conflict across Europe, and have been selected on the grounds that they not only provide a rich ethnographic account of overt ethnic conflict or racial violence, but also relate these local situations to wider processes. The contributors do not put forward a single homogeneous point of view, but they all assume perspectives that are opposed to the prevalent simplistic primordialism of most media coverage and political analysis. Most of the contributors are anthropologists and have presented drafts of their chapters at a series of meetings organised by a network called the Forum Against Violence. Many of the articles have appeared previously in the International Journal on Minority and Group Rights (Volume 4). This book should be of interest to academics and practitioners in the fields of human rights, anthropology and related topics.

Edited by Mark W. Janis and Carolyn Evans

One of the great tasks, perhaps the greatest, weighing on modern international lawyers is to craft a universal law and legal process capable of ordering relations among diverse people with differing religions, histories, cultures, laws, and languages. In so doing, we need to take the world's peoples as we find them and not pretend out of existence their wide variety.
This volume, now available in paperback, builds on the eleven essays edited by Mark Janis in 1991 in The Influence of Religion and the Development of International Law, more than doubling its authors and essays and covering more religious traditions. Now included are studies of the interface between international law and ancient religions, Confucianism, Hinduism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, as well as essays addressing the impact of religious thought on the literature and sources of international law, international courts, and human rights law.

Religion, Human Rights and International Law

A Critical Examination of Islamic State Practices

Series:

Edited by Javaid Rehman and Susan Breau

Freedom of religion is a subject, which has throughout human history been a source of profound disagreements and conflict. In the modern era, religious-based intolerance continues to provide lacerative and tormenting concern to the possibility of congenial human relationships. As the present study examines, religions have been relied upon to perpetuate discrimination and inequalities, and to victimise minorities to the point of forcible assimilation and genocide. The study provides an overview of the complexities inherent in the freedom of religion within international law and an analysis of the cultural-religious relativist debate in contemporary human rights law. As many of the chapters examine, Islamic State practices have been a major source of concern. In the backdrop of the events of 11 September 2001, a considerable focus of this volume is upon the Muslim world, either through the emergent State practices and existing constitutional structures within Muslim majority States or through Islamic diasporic communities resident in Europe and North-America.

Theologians and Contract Law

The Moral Transformation of the Ius Commune (ca. 1500-1650)

Series:

Wim Decock

The Roman legal tradition is the ancestor of modern contract law but there is no agreement as to how and when a general law of contract emerged. Wim Decock’s thesis is that an important step in this evolution was taken by theologians in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. They transformed the Roman legal tradition (ius commune) by insisting on the moral foundations of contract law. Theologians emphasized that the enforceability of contracts is based on voluntary consent and that a contract should not enrich one party at another's expense. While their main concern was the salvation of souls, theologians played a key role in the development of a systematic contract law in which the founding principles were freedom and fairness.

Theologians and Contract Law is winner of the Heinz Maier-Leibnitz-Preis 2014 (German Research Foundation) as well as the Raymond Derine Prijs 2012 (Raymond Derine PhD Prize) and the ASL-Prijs Humane Wetenschappen 2012 (ASL Award for Humanities 2012) by the Academische Stichting Leuven. Decock's book is also awarded the "Juristisches Buch des Jahres" (Law book of the year) by Neue Juristische Wochenschrift (47/2013: 3420).