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Edited by Mark W. Janis and Carolyn Evans

One of the great tasks, perhaps the greatest, weighing on modern international lawyers is to craft a universal law and legal process capable of ordering relations among diverse people with differing religions, histories, cultures, laws, and languages. In so doing, we need to take the world's peoples as we find them and not pretend out of existence their wide variety.
This volume, now available in paperback, builds on the eleven essays edited by Mark Janis in 1991 in The Influence of Religion and the Development of International Law, more than doubling its authors and essays and covering more religious traditions. Now included are studies of the interface between international law and ancient religions, Confucianism, Hinduism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, as well as essays addressing the impact of religious thought on the literature and sources of international law, international courts, and human rights law.

Edited by Carolyn Evans and Mark W. Janis

One of the great tasks, perhaps the greatest, weighing on modern international lawyers is to craft a universal law and legal process capable of ordering relations among diverse people with differing religions, histories, cultures, laws, and languages. In so doing, we need to take the world's peoples as we find them and not pretend out of existence their wide variety.
This volume builds on the eleven essays edited by Mark Janis in 1991 in The Influence of Religion and the Development of International Law, more than doubling its authors and essays and covering more religious traditions. Now included are studies of the interface between international law and ancient religions, Confucianism, Hinduism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, as well as essays addressing the impact of religious thought on the literature and sources of international law, international courts, and human rights law.

Aaron J. Saiger

we mostly do today. Progressivism strenuously opposed schools taking a position in the “sectarian,” internecine doctrinal and political debates of Protestantism. 21 But anti-sectarianism did not imply a rejection of the nondenominational Protestantism typical of American schools into the second half

Michael A. Livingston

suggested that this view is a misreading of the church and state concept, and somewhat wickedly, that secularism is a Protestant concept that would be unknown in most of the world, and that the effect of this practice constitutes a form of prejudice against religion and would result in a “naked public

Michael Walzer

said to undermine religious authority. In the US, orthodox Catholics, Jews, and Muslims sometimes claim that their children are being “protestantized,” since Protestant congregationalism is much closer to democracy than their own organizational practices are. At the same time, fundamentalist

Jeff Spinner-Halev

discrimination. On the other hand, liberalism grants the right to private institutions to determine their own rules, even if these are discriminatory. Few liberals would insist that a synagogue accept non-Jews as equal members or that the Catholic Church allow Protestants to become priests. To complicate matters

Nathan B. Oman

Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism, Max Weber argued that the Reformation fostered a peculiar ethic of materialized asceticism, in which the accumulation of wealth was prized as evidence of God’s grace, but its consumption was strongly discouraged as undisciplined licentiousness. 37 The

Secularisation and Theologisation

Examining the Inner Dynamic behind the British Colonial Encounter with “Hindu Law”

Geetanjali Srikantan

takes Protestant Christianity as its model, privileging belief and being inattentive to disciplinary practices in Islam and monastic Christianity. Thus, the secular must be analyzed through Western historical formations that show the transition to Protestant forms of thinking. 12 Fitzgerald 13 argues

Micha’el M. Tanchum

. 2. Islam and state: Founding intentions at the time of the establishment of Pakistan The triumph of Protestant nationalism in late 17th century England initiated the development of the Lockean, self-limiting state, a polity in which the state does not establish a religion, nor does religion

Jianlin Chen

competition between religions, with minimal interference from the federal government, was a useful tool for resolving the tensions and conflicts of interests between the various Protestant sects and the strands of deisms in America during the founding era. 15 2.2 Modern Revival The religious free market