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Editors: Liu Xiaonan and Wang Liwan
In Equality and Anti-Discrimination: The Road to Equal Rights in China, Professors Liu Xiaonan and Wang Liwan collect experienced scholars in the field of anti-discrimination law to conduct deep discussions on the manifestations, causes, and solutions of discrimination issues in China. Since the reform and opening up in China, the government has loosened its governance, and the market economy and civil society have developed. However, many economic and social discriminations have also emerged and caused widespread social contradictions and legal dilemmas. In this book, equality rights and discrimination issues are investigated in a panoramic way from the perspective of law, and .insightful suggestions are made.
The authors believe that anti-discrimination research and actions in the field of Chinese law are carried out simultaneously with political changes and economic development. In this process, experts and scholars, public media, research institutions, and non-governmental organizations play important roles. The awakening of civil rights awareness and the emergence of rights protection actions for vulnerable groups are the sources of anti-discrimination research and actions in the field of law.
Author: Katrin Buchmann
Buchmann analyses the work of UK, German, Danish and Swedish embassies in the USA and China on climate change in the late 2000s and early 2010s. She relates which coalitions and narratives embassies sought to develop to convince China and the United States that a more progressive climate policy was possible, to achieve gains supporting an agreement under the UNFCCC. This book shows that a key interpretation of climate diplomacy was selling/trade: Europe selling technology “solutions” to solve climate change. In this narrative, Europe has already done what needs to be done and outsourcing of production to China e.g. is ignored. In the USA, embassies entered coalitions with states, faith groups and the military, arguing that a more progressive climate policy was mandated by either God or security concerns. State politicians, including Democrats, often actually didn’t implement any climate policies. Any gains were reversed through climate denial lobbying funded by corporations. Embassies did not address this.
Volume Editor: Chia-Jui Cheng
A New Global Economic Order: New Challenges to International Trade Law examines the dislocating effects of the policies implemented by the Trump Administration on the global economic order. Leading scholars and practitioners of international economic law come together to defend multilateralism against unilateralism and populism. Further, the book analyzes the current US Administration’s new national recovery blueprint on how to draw a line of demarcation from previous policies. Edited by Chia-Jui Cheng, the collection offers a compelling new strategy for defending a multilateral international economic order which preserves the public good, international peace and prosperity, and shapes a new global economic order, leading to "a new community of the common destiny of mankind".
Law-Making and Local Normativities in Iberian Asia, 1500-1800
Volume Editor: Manuel Bastias Saavedra
Norms beyond Empire seeks to rethink the relationship between law and empire by emphasizing the role of local normative production. While European imperialism is often viewed as being able to shape colonial law and government to its image, this volume argues that early modern empires could never monolithically control how these processes unfolded. Examining the Iberian empires in Asia, it seeks to look at norms as a means of escaping the often too narrow concept of law and look beyond empire to highlight the ways in which law-making and local normativities frequently acted beyond colonial rule. The ten chapters explore normative production from this perspective by focusing on case studies from China, India, Japan, and the Philippines.

Contributors are: Manuel Bastias Saavedra, Marya Svetlana T. Camacho, Luisa Stella de Oliveira Coutinho Silva, Rômulo da Silva Ehalt, Patricia Souza de Faria, Fupeng Li, Miguel Rodrigues Lourenço, Abisai Perez Zamarripa, Marina Torres Trimállez, and Ângela Barreto Xavier.
The dynamic processes of ordering we are witnessing around the world blend the extra-national with the national, the public with the private, the political and economic with the social and cultural. Issues of effectiveness, procedural and substantial justice, costs, incentives, voice, and inequality in these processes are growing in importance. This series aims to grasp these phenomena channeling them into the legal debate.

The series publishes books, authored or edited, covering various aspects of private, public, criminal, transnational and global law. The broad ambition of the series underlines the editors' belief that in the legal world there is a growing need to expand our knowledge of legal orders (national or supranational, official and unofficial), of their historical roots and of their practical dimensions.
Sponsoring States’ Environmental Legislation for Deep Seabed Mining and China’s Practice
Author: Xiangxin Xu
This contribution provides the important and timely bilingual version of the Chinese Civil Code and the Supreme People’s Court’s Judicial Interpretation on the Temporal Effect of the Civil Code. Providing translations by a diverse group of esteemed legal scholars, on Contract Law, Tort Law, Marriage, Family and Succession Law, General and Personality Provisions and Property Law, this unique resource will be important for all those with an interest in Chinese Law.
This is a collection of international law materials relating to the Philippines: excerpts of treaties and declarations; international judicial and arbitral decisions; and Philippine constitutional clauses, statutes and Supreme Court decisions.

Today new theories abound, calling for comparative perspectives that look at International Law through the lens of national and regional practice. This book engages that challenge at a concrete level, e.g., how the Marcos human rights abuses were litigated abroad but never in Philippine courts, and how victim claims for reparations are, ironically, blocked by the Philippine Government citing the Filipino people’s competing claims over Marcoses' ill-gotten wealth. It retells Philippine history using international law, and re-examines international law using the Philippine experience.
The Asian Yearbook of Human Rights and Humanitarian Law aims to publish peer-reviewed scholarly articles and reviews as well as significant developments in human rights and humanitarian law. It examines international human rights and humanitarian law with a global reach, though its particular focus is on the Asian region.

The focused theme of Volume 5 is Law, Culture and Human Rights in Asia and the Middle East.
Editors: Chong ZHANG and Ruoyu LI
This volume contains a selection of the edited and in some cases translated papers presented at the first South-South Human Rights Forum held in Beijing. The conference was jointly sponsored by the State Council Information Office and the Chinese Ministry of Foreign Affairs. The event drew hundreds of participants, mainly scholars and government officials from developing countries and international organizations. Its main theme was “Building a Human Community with a Shared Future”, which built on a proposal launched by President Xi Jinping. The papers are mostly short and often policy-oriented, offering a unique insight into the thinking and planning associated with this South-South exchange and thus a wealth of information of interest to scholars. The topics covered emerge primarily from development-related issues, such as the rights to food, education, health and poverty reduction. Though much of the volume thus focuses on economic and social rights and the right to development, civil and political rights are also discussed in the context of the need for legal guarantees for the exercise of human rights and judicial protection of rights.