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The Ibadis in the Region of the Indian Ocean. Section One : East Africa , Hildesheim-Zürich-New York, Georg Olms Verlag (« Studies on Ibadism and Oman », 1), 2013, 446 p., isbn : 978-3-487-14801-4, 68 € relié. Le livre de Heinz Gaube, consacré à la côte swahilie, se veut une compilation

In: Arabica
Author: INEKE WELLENS

/Philadelphia: John Benjamins. 247–58. Beachey, R.W. 1967. The East African ivory trade in the nineteenth century. JAH. VIII 2. 269–90. Behnstedt, Peter and Manfred Woidich. 1985a. Die ägyptisch-arabischen Dialekte. Band 1: Einleitung und Anmerkungen zu den Karten. Wiesbaden: Dr. Ludwig Reichert Verlag. —— 1985b. Die

In: The Nubi Language of Uganda
Author: INEKE WELLENS

distal Egyptian Arabic East African Nubi emphasizer equative existential feminine focus marker future genitive particle gerund high pitch/tone habitual imperative imperfective indefinite article xii abbreviations INF INSTR INT INTRANS IRR ITER JA KA KN L LD LOC MASC MOD N NE NON- PUNCT NON- REF NP NPRO

In: The Nubi Language of Uganda
Author: INEKE WELLENS

–245 Equatorial Province, 11, 14–16, 21, 23 existential marker ‘fi, 200–203 Fa∂l al-Maulâ, 17–18, 22, 32, 34, 40, 42 focus markers, 237–44, 366–68 fusion, 59–60 future marker bi-, 153–56, 347–48 gerunds 54, 184–193 See also nominalization Gordon 11–13, 28, 30–31 imperative, 173–76, 351–53, Imperial British East

In: The Nubi Language of Uganda
Author: INEKE WELLENS

, who represented the Imperial British East Africa Company, found them there. Lugard (1968, 210) describes the scene as follows: There was great joy and kissing of my hand (which they touch with their foreheads), and handshaking with Shukri and my Sudanese. Every one talked at the same time, and

In: The Nubi Language of Uganda

. Joseph 31, fasc. 2, pp. 15-95. ----" 1966, 'Characteristics of the Ethiopic language group of Semitic Languages', in AN. Tucker, M.A Bryan (eds.), Linguistic Analyses: The Non-Bantu Languages of North-East Africa, Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 593-613. ----, 1987, Comparative Dictionary of

In: Semitic Studies in Honour of Edward Ullendorff
Author: INEKE WELLENS

‘sesame’ are commonly used ingredients for meals in general and for special meals, such as festivities, in particular. Therefore, it is possible that both items should be regarded as belonging to the culturally shared knowledge of the Nubi, or even the group of East Africans, which explains the use of the

In: The Nubi Language of Uganda
Author: INEKE WELLENS

speakers. Several authors writing on the ori- gins of p/c Arabic in East Africa, such as Owens (1985a, 229–71, 1996, 125–72), and Kaye (1985, 201–30), propose a proto-p/c, for which they take WSA as the main source, considering the many similarities between the two groups of languages. An alternative pos

In: The Nubi Language of Uganda
Editor: R.S. O'Fahey
The present volume is fascicle A of volume III of Arabic Literature of Africa, edited by J.O. Hunwick and R.S. O'Fahey. The fascicle, compiled by O'Fahey and several collaborators, covers the Islamic writings of Northeastern Africa in Arabic and in several local languages, including Amharic, Tigrinya, Harari and Somali.
Geographically, the fascicle covers the modern states of Eritrea, Ethiopia, Djibouti and Somalia. Although the Islamic literature of the region is limited, it includes an important poetic tradition in Somali and Harari and the writings of a major scholar of the colonial period in Eritrea. The volume is divided into four chapters and follows the usual ALA format. It will be followed by fascicle B, which will cover East Africa, especially Kenya and Tanzania.
Editors: John Hunwick and R.S. O'Fahey
Eventually to be completed in six volumes, Arabic Literature of Africa will provide a survey of Muslim authors writing in Arabic in Saharan and sub-Saharan Africa and a bibliography of their works. Falling within the tradition of the great works of Brockelmann and Sezgin, it will form a basic reference tool for the study of Arabic writing in areas of the African Islamic world that fall outside the parameters of these works. While primarily a work of reference, it will also attempt to provide an outline of the intellectual history of Muslim societies in the areas it covers: the Nile valley, East Africa and the Horn of Africa, West Africa and the western Sahara, from earliest times to the present.
The first volume covers Eastern Sudanic Africa (mainly the modern Sudan) until approximately 1900. It comprises twelve chapters organised by theme or period and aims to present as complete a coverage as the present state of our knowledge will allow.