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Publication History and Catholic Missions in the Spanish World (Spain, New Spain, and the Philippines, 1597–1700)
In The Martyrs of Japan, Rady Roldán-Figueroa examines the role that Catholic missionary orders played in the dissemination of accounts of Christian martyrdom in Japan. The work combines several historiographical approaches, including publication history, history of missions, and “new” institutional history. The author offers an overarching portrayal of the writing, printing, and circulation of books of ‘Japano-martyrology.’
The book is organized into two parts. The first part, “Spirituality of Writing, Publication History, and Japano-martyrology,” addresses topics ranging from the historical background of Christianity in Japan to the publishers of Japano-martyrology. The second part, “Jesuits, Discalced Franciscans, and the Production of Japano-martyrology in the Early Modern Spanish World,” features closer analysis of selected works of Japano-martyrology by Jesuit and Discalced Franciscan writers.

Venice. In the same way, Pasio went as a missionary to India in 1578, and in 1583 he went to Japan. He had administrative roles until he became the vice-provincial of the Jesuit mission in Japan in 1600, a role he fulfilled until 1611. He then served until his death as visitor of China and Japan. 20

In: The Martyrs of Japan

globe, characterized by an asymmetric relation of power between colonizers and indigenous people groups. 14 Michael Cooper described the Jesuit missionary strategy as the “halfway mark in the development of missiological thought and practice” prior to the Jesuit missionary experience in China; a mix of

In: The Martyrs of Japan

“among pearls,” a “powerful empire” (“… imperio poderoso …”) in which “sixty-six kingdoms bow before him” (“… de sesenta y seis reinos se le inclina …”). That place was Japan, “surrounded by the Chinese sea, flooded with silver” (“Es el Japón, que yace rodeado / del chino mar en fina plata undoso

In: The Martyrs of Japan

of the Emperors, Ecclesiastical and Secular; Of The Original Descent, Religions, Customs, and Manufactures of the Natives, and of their Trade and Commerce with the Dutch and Chinese. Together with a Description of the Kingdom of Siam. Written in High Dutch by Engelbertus Kæmpfer, M. D. Physician to

In: The Martyrs of Japan

, “Filipo Magno,” in Piñeiro, Relación , fol. [4v]. 42 Moran, The Japanese and the Jesuits , 1–19; Andrew C. Ross, A Vision Betrayed: The Jesuits in Japan and China (1542–1742) (Maryknoll: Orbis Books, 1994), 47–78. 43 Valignano, Sumario , 81–89. 44 James Murdoch, A History of Japan , 3 vols

In: The Martyrs of Japan

throughout Asia, including China. 93 In this way the Province of San Gregorio became the center of discalced missionary activity in the Philippines, Southeast Asia, and even New Spain. Particularly significant was the administrative relation that was developed between the Province of San Gregorio in the

In: The Martyrs of Japan

-Figueroa, “Religious Literature and its Institutional Contexts,” 153–161. 19 Nicolas Standaert has suggested that the analysis of the circulation of books be organized into three moments, namely production, distribution, and consumption. Nicolas Standaert, “An Intercultural Circuit of Books between China and Europe

In: The Martyrs of Japan

Discalced Franciscans wrote several accounts describing the persecution of Christians in Japan. One of these writers was Marcelo de Ribadeneira. His Historia de las islas del archipiélago filipino y reinos de la gran China, Tartaria, Cochinchina, Malaca, Siam, Cambodge y Japón was published in Barcelona

In: The Martyrs of Japan

santo evangelio en la India Oriental y en los reinos de la China y Japón was a lucid narrative of the first six decades of the Society of Jesus’ missionary activity in parts of Africa, the Americas, and Asia. The range of its coverage included Francis Xavier’s time at the University of Paris and the

In: The Martyrs of Japan

China. 9 In its print version, the report contained a section with an overview of the state of affairs in Japan and describing the wretched condition of Catholicism in the country. The report even made a passing reference to Carlo Spinola. However, the report did not contain narrative accounts of the

In: The Martyrs of Japan

in the Chinese neighborhood of Binondoc (Binondo). In 1625, it was relocated to the Colegio de Santo Tomás of Manila. 44 Dominican martyrologists based in the Philippines used the printing press to divulge reports of episodes of persecution that occurred in Japan in the 1620s and 1630s that resulted

In: The Martyrs of Japan

not simply promote a cult of domesticity, or what Jane Hunter called in her 1984 study of missions in China, a “gospel of gentility”. 19 Nor did American women missionaries single-mindedly groom young Egyptian women for marriage so that they could become, in a Victorian mode, “producers of domestic

In: Social Sciences and Missions
Author: Karolin Wetjen

fruitful perspective on German missions during both World Wars in former German colonies. Before 1914, German missions of both denominations worked all over the world. Lutherans tried to promulgate their faith not only in the more prominent regions of India and Africa but also in China, Australia, or

In: Social Sciences and Missions
Author: Yi Liu

their transnational network even makes them more challenging. Joshua Dao Wei Sim describes three identity types of Chinese Christian diaspora, namely evangelical identity, religious nationalism and religious ethnocentrism. Especially, he highlights evangelism as a key factor of constructing three

In: Social Sciences and Missions

, religious and political coalitions that can be forged between different ‘outsiders’ that make up diasporic communities in a host society. One such fruitful coalition Kwok mentions is the Chinese-Jewish axis which she finds insightful and constructive in her own interrogation of ‘centre’ and ‘periphery’ in

In: Intimate Diversity
Methodological Considerations
Volume Editors: Martha Frederiks and Dorottya Nagy
World Christianity publications proliferate but the issue of methodology has received little attention. World Christianity: Methodological Considerations addresses this lacuna and explores the methodological ramifications of the World Christianity turn. In twelve chapters scholars from various academic backgrounds (anthropology, religious studies, history, missiology, intercultural studies, theology, and patristics) as well as of multiple cultural and national belongings investigate methodological issues (e.g. methods, use of sources, choosing a unit of analysis, terminology, conceptual categories,) relevant to World Christianity debates. In a closing chapter the editors Frederiks and Nagy converge the findings and sketch the outlines of what they coin as a ‘World Christianity approach’, a multidisciplinary and multiple perspective approach to study Christianity/ies’ plurality and diversity in past and present.

interregional system that had the “west of China, in Hindustan and the Islamic world” as its center to a “world system” whose center moved to Western Europe. Prior to that, Latino-Germanic Europe was a peripheral world, “isolated from the Asiatic-Mediterranean system” (Dussel 2013b: 23). Columbus’ discovery of

Open Access
In: World Christianity

is known that already during Jesus’ time there were trade routes via sea connecting the Middle East to India and beyond. There was also a land route leading all the way to the provinces of China, later to be called the ‘Silk Road’. These trade routes had led to the establishment of Arab, Jewish

Open Access
In: World Christianity

absence of Oriental and Eastern Orthodoxy in World Christianity literature, Nagy (2010) to the recurring trope-like references to China’s growth and Frederiks (2019) to the highly selective portrayal of migrant Christianity in Europe. In as much as these selective representations are problematic in their

Open Access
In: World Christianity

China, make working with sources the central concern of their contribution. Much has already been said and written about the “interpretation, problems and possibilities of working with missionary sources in the history of Christianity”, to quote the title of Wild-Wood’s chapter to this volume. In order

Open Access
In: World Christianity

1 Introduction To stage a meaningful dialogue between China area studies and Christianity worldwide, this chapter draws on the changing landscape of Chinese Christianities to reframe certain parameters and norms in the study of global Christian movements. By focusing on the interplay

Open Access
In: World Christianity
Author: Dorottya Nagy

the cheap and widely circulating translations of two Chinese novels that led to Goethe’s revelation on world literature. 7 The genealogies described above bring to mind discourses on ranking theologies, such as the ‘theologies from below versus theologies from above’, or ‘popular theology versus

Open Access
In: World Christianity

the text of the Nestorian monument, commemorating the 150th anniversary of the ‘luminous religion’ in China (781) and the dialogue between the Abbasid caliph al-Mahdī and Nestorian Patriarch Timothy I in Baghdad (c. 780). Both materials originate from the same period and church tradition, but where