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Editor: O'Fahey
The present volume is fascicle A of volume III of Arabic Literature of Africa, edited by J.O. Hunwick and R.S. O'Fahey. The fascicle, compiled by O'Fahey and several collaborators, covers the Islamic writings of Northeastern Africa in Arabic and in several local languages, including Amharic, Tigrinya, Harari and Somali.
Geographically, the fascicle covers the modern states of Eritrea, Ethiopia, Djibouti and Somalia. Although the Islamic literature of the region is limited, it includes an important poetic tradition in Somali and Harari and the writings of a major scholar of the colonial period in Eritrea. The volume is divided into four chapters and follows the usual ALA format. It will be followed by fascicle B, which will cover East Africa, especially Kenya and Tanzania.
Editors: John Hunwick and O'Fahey
Eventually to be completed in six volumes, Arabic Literature of Africa will provide a survey of Muslim authors writing in Arabic in Saharan and sub-Saharan Africa and a bibliography of their works. Falling within the tradition of the great works of Brockelmann and Sezgin, it will form a basic reference tool for the study of Arabic writing in areas of the African Islamic world that fall outside the parameters of these works. While primarily a work of reference, it will also attempt to provide an outline of the intellectual history of Muslim societies in the areas it covers: the Nile valley, East Africa and the Horn of Africa, West Africa and the western Sahara, from earliest times to the present.
The first volume covers Eastern Sudanic Africa (mainly the modern Sudan) until approximately 1900. It comprises twelve chapters organised by theme or period and aims to present as complete a coverage as the present state of our knowledge will allow.
Translator: Joep Lameer
The present English translation reproduces the original German of Carl Brockelmann’s Geschichte der Arabischen Litteratur (GAL) as accurately as possible. In the interest of user-friendliness the following emendations have been made in the translation: Personal names are written out in full, except b. for ibn; Brockelmann’s transliteration of Arabic has been adapted to comply with modern standards for English-language publications; modern English equivalents are given for place names, e.g. Damascus, Cairo, Jerusalem, etc.; several erroneous dates have been corrected, and the page references to the two German editions have been retained in the margin, except in the Supplement volumes, where new references to the first two English volumes have been inserted.
The present English translation reproduces the original German of Carl Brockelmann’s Geschichte der Arabischen Litteratur (GAL) as accurately as possible. In the interest of user-friendliness the following emendations have been made in the translation: Personal names are written out in full, except b. for ibn; Brockelmann’s transliteration of Arabic has been adapted to comply with modern standards for English-language publications; modern English equivalents are given for place names, e.g. Damascus, Cairo, Jerusalem, etc.; several erroneous dates have been corrected, and the page references to the two German editions have been retained in the margin, except in the Supplement volumes, where new references to the first two English volumes have been inserted.