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one would expect in a treatise, only short paragraphs presenting Ignatius’s thoughts with regard to particular issues or his actions in given situations. The word “governance” in the title is also misleading, since attention is frequently drawn to Ignatius’s personal virtues or opinions: these lie

In: Journal of Jesuit Studies

remembered when they speak loudly to the present. Emphasizing this would have only strengthened López-Menéndez’s argument that saints and martyrs are every bit as political as they are religious. Theoretical and learned, this book would be difficult for undergraduates and the lay reader. However, it would

In: Journal of Jesuit Studies

awe ” as they see how Hopkins can still effectively “strike wonder,” be unique, and present the world as an “expression [...] of God” (xvi). The poet, “obsessed with words and their infinitely variable, infinitely peculiar combinations” (xvii), had a fine ear for unusual phrasings, rhythms, and sounds

In: Journal of Jesuit Studies

those who had died unprepared, early modern funeral sermons emphasized the piety of the deceased. Whether this means that “nobody died unprepared” is debatable. In her chapter on suicide, Riikka Miettinen points out that although funeral sermons presented pious life as a sufficient “means of grace even

In: Journal of Jesuit Studies

the secular Enlightenment was often great. The expulsions and suppressions of the Jesuits in various European countries has been most often presented as an inexorable fall of the dominoes culminating in Dominus ac redemptor . Van Kley’s narrative is not only more subtle than this; he also sheds light

In: Journal of Jesuit Studies

the Lusophone world and “pervasive” expressions of messianism in Portugal and Brazil (5), throughout the book various aspects of a shared Iberian prophetic imagination remain clear: scriptural reading practices shaped by Jewish and Moorish pasts and a new Christian present, the influence of Joachim de

In: Journal of Jesuit Studies

enlightening the recent scholarship and offering a reflection on the achievements in present trends of research. The first part of the book focuses on the Americas, with essays discussing Christianity in Mexico (Christensen), the Andes (Maldavsky), Paraguay (Wilde), Brazil (McGinness), and New France

In: Journal of Jesuit Studies

issues. In doing so, the book pays great attention to the metaphor of light as a symbol of knowledge, which had a theological origin and was central to many self-reflexive accounts of the Age of Enlightenment. The volume consists of an introduction by the editors and three parts presenting four chapters

In: Journal of Jesuit Studies

Frank Gordon. Boston: Brill, 2016. Pp. xi + 274. Hb, $150. Historians of the religious upheavals in mid-sixteenth-century Italy traditionally have been presented with a methodological problem—being unable to track or analyze heretical preaching in Italian pulpits because of its inherent

In: Journal of Jesuit Studies

New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2014. Pp. vii + 322. Hb, $105. In Global Goods and the Spanish Empire , Bethany Aram and Bartolomé Yun-Casalilla present an eclectic assortment of essays on Atlantic goods in the Spanish empire, most of them focusing on the European appropriation of goods from the New

In: Journal of Jesuit Studies