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Josephus’ narrative claims and to present possible answers to my historical questions.” (p. 68) The other large subject in this chapter is Josephus’ possible role as a prophet and the question whether he, because of his prediction, had a special place in Vespasian’s entourage. Den Hollander shows that the

In: Journal for the Study of Judaism

Judaism. Background: The Fifth Sibylline Oracle and the Sibylline Tradition The Fifth Sibylline Oracle is a collection of 531 verses of Greek hexa- meter poetry containing predictions of doom and gloom for various cities in Asia Minor, Egypt, and Rome. It also contains other “prophe- cies” which praise

In: Journal for the Study of Judaism

prediction that he will die in the near future. Second, this verse is a lead into the phrase "and remember your handmaid," when he dies marry me13). Finally, it strengthens the application of the two folk-sayings to Abigail's action, doing two things at the same time. III THE PRIMORDIAL SERPENT The rabbis

In: Journal for the Study of Judaism

of Solomon is clearly not a testament, but the Assumption of Moses is; here the author's story is convincing. We should note, however, that this writing consists mainly of predictions, has no "Rückblick" and only two short parenetic passages. Nevertheless, according to V ON NORDHEIM, the author

In: Journal for the Study of Judaism

parenesis and the predictions which are found in practically all individual testaments, but he also mentions smaller units as e.g. the Sin-Exile-Return passages and the statements concerning Levi and Judah. He emphasizes that he is not interested in formcritical analysis proper, but tries to find

In: Journal for the Study of Judaism

difficult to ignore Stone’s point. Unfortunately, he does not come far in pursuing the topic; but I think that progress may be made if recent insights from cognitive theory are taken into consideration (prediction theory may be particularly advantageous in this regard). In the fifth chapter on Bible and

In: Journal for the Study of Judaism

future judgment. Re- spectively, these two passages constitute a prayer for, and a prediction of, the judgment to come. In the same way, in XXXI:II.1-2, the midrashist uses the imperfect verb-forms in the phrases "you send forth your fury" and "it consumes them like stubble" to turn the text of Exodus

In: Review of Rabbinic Judaism

its programmatic nature that included predictions concerning the eschaton , apocalyptic literature had a more universal scope and a larger appeal to diverse religious groups than other Jewish or Christian literature. Apoca- lyptic literature expressed the belief that God had determined the conclusion

In: Review of Rabbinic Judaism

,5)'). There is a direct connection between the exhortations and the predictions of the future. The Testaments are very much interested in the future of Israel; they not only look ahead at the events be- tween the fictitious and the actual time of writing (and reading) but also deal with the final destiny of

In: Journal for the Study of Judaism

, GARCiA MARTÍNEZ understands 4Q246 in the light of Qumran community ideas. In i 1-6 he sees apocalyp- tic prediction of history, similar to that of 4QpsDan ar. The mysterious personage in i 7-ii 3 is identified by him as the archangel Michael, who then leads the final battle against Belial in ii 4

In: Journal for the Study of Judaism