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apocalyptic genre. 17 This partial text pattern applies to Pesiqta Rabbati, which is not an apocalyptic book, but nevertheless contains topics typical of apocalypses, including revelation, wars and famine, the cause of human suffering, the eradication of evil, and eschatological predictions. 18 The heuristic

In: Journal for the Study of Judaism

Sam. 17,34-37 David says that God freed him from the lion and the bear, and considers this evidence that God will deliver him from Goliath, but there is nothing to correspond to God's use of this as a prediction as in Pseudo-Philo. 7 David said to him, "Before you die, open your eyes and see your

In: Journal for the Study of Judaism

town ( בעיר ) shall be devoured by dogs; and anyone who dies in the countryside ( בשדה ) shall be eaten by the birds of the sky” (1 Kgs 14:11). Elijah delivers the same prediction to Ahab (1 Kgs 21:24), and in the fulfillment of this curse prostitutes join the dogs to represent the debasement of Ahab

In: Vetus Testamentum

apocalyptic timetable. Once again there is the description of history as well as a prediction of the future. Further, the description of the future seems comparable to the announce- ment of judgment in the prophetic judgment speech. Summary Structure. The Animal Apocalypse is similar to that of the lOWApoc

In: Journal for the Study of Judaism

/ Journal for the Study of Judaism 38 (2007) 226-233 by the poet of Song of Songs to the beloved woman. Otherwise, such a con- clusion is not necessary. 4 E zra 4:37 Th is verse occurs in a passage of predictive discourse, which is introduced by a somewhat cryptic prediction (4:26-32). Following that we

In: Journal for the Study of Judaism

which predictions of the future are found. Its structure runs parallel to the constant pattern in each of the paraphrases of our tradition in the Targum: a. I have much grief, my children, because of the lewdness and witchcrafts and idolatries 65) that you will practise against the kingdom, b. following

In: Journal for the Study of Judaism

story would have understood Josephus’ added mentions of the Jews’ δουλεία in Egypt as references to the Jews’ chattel slavery, a Roman audience, unfamiliar with the Jews’ ancient history, might not have understood them in this way. Because Jewish Antiquities omits God’s prediction of the Jews’ slavery

In: Journal for the Study of Judaism

:1). The depiction of these times follows in chapters 5-6, concluding with reference to the coming of “a mighty king from the West” (6:8). After a lacuna we then read in chapter 7 of “pestilent and impious men” who rule over the people, followed in 8:1 by the prediction that “suddenly revenge and wrath

In: Journal for the Study of Judaism

, Ant. 12:160-222", JJS 32 (1981), 47-55. I have been particularly influ- enced by Professor NIDITCH's recent research on the Jacob and Joseph cycles. 12 ) BERGER, Das Buch der jubilden, 10. 5 happen after his death. This prediction is fulfulled in 46:11, as the gates of Egypt are closed. A new king

In: Journal for the Study of Judaism

. Thus Sarna’s response to the more dire predictions of others is that Judaism’s best years still may be ahead. What I think we may safely assume is that Jewish identity will look radically different in the future. For this reason we need to understand more clearly the fastest growing contingent, those

In: Review of Rabbinic Judaism