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protest against the present violations of human right only in a restrained and conciliatory form. 2. Because of their past failure, it is not the German church dignitaries who are called to speak as the advocates of humanity but rather the church leaders of other countries who have had the courage of

In: Journal of Jesuit Studies

theology. In Part One, Savory and Berne present Teilhard’s vision of God as love, and love as the essential energy of the evolving universe. They stress that Teilhard understood love not simply as a divine attribute or divine name, but as an energy that people experience in everyday life. Love is neither

In: Journal of Jesuit Studies

Euro-sinica 14. Bern: Peter Lang, 2014. Pp. 373. Pb, $103.95. The core of the present volume (183–341) is a punctuated edition (alongside an annotated English translation) of the Dadao jiyan [Illustrations of the Grand Dao] (1636), the product of a collaboration between the Jesuit missionary

In: Journal of Jesuit Studies

the psychological questions about the processes of cognition and the formation of universal concepts. The book is well structured, and each element is nicely integrated into the whole. As each new theory is presented, it is brought into detailed comparison with those already presented, thereby

In: Journal of Jesuit Studies

mindset when it comes to its past, such as the missionary activity of the Society of Jesus or even historical biographies. For example, the Society of Jesus has been one of the most present themes in the history of Portugal. This, in part, is due to the “myth” that was built around it during the first two

In: Journal of Jesuit Studies

-examples” wherein, following José de Acosta, “Satan was in his Rome or Jerusalem” (243). Part iv : Neo-Baroque Approaches to Identity. The baroque is not decoupled from early modern history, but rather, the tether that connects that history to our present itself becomes an object of attention. The “neo-baroque” is

In: Journal of Jesuit Studies

, with no priest present. In the conclusion, Luebke takes the reader beyond Westphalia into the Holy Roman Empire and explores six modes of religious accommodation present in the sixteenth to the eighteenth centuries, in spite of the Thirty Years’ War and the process of confessionalization. The modes

In: Journal of Jesuit Studies

subsequently excommunicated. However, all of the contributions under survey in the present volume were published before the condemnations, so while they may be viewed as a lead up to the condemnations, they were also part of an engaged debate that was more about the issues than it was an argument simply from

In: Journal of Jesuit Studies

of Beatus Rhenanus’s Second Vita Erasmi (1540) illustrates the complexities of Erasmus’s reception. In this life of his close friend, Rhenanus strategically avoids controversial aspects of Erasmus’s works to prevent new polemical outbursts. He suppresses and excludes literary works to present the

In: Journal of Jesuit Studies

Lisbon with the help of the Jesuits in Goa. In her essay, Burglind Jungmann examines the incorporation of European traditions by Korean artists, presenting examples of eighteenth-century Korean portraits that represent Western techniques of naturalism, such as shading and modeling, while maintaining the

In: Journal of Jesuit Studies