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Moses (beginning of narrative) and King Josiah (end of narrative), the prominence of Egypt throughout the narrative (especially at key places), and the prediction—fulfillment relationship between the climactic curse of Deut 28:68 and its realization in 2 Kgs 25:26 (cf. Jer 43:4-7). 4 Both scholars have

In: Vetus Testamentum

contain predictions of the exile, and Jer 7, 24, 27, and 32. 27 He has gathered these various passages together on the basis of how they reflect on the urgency for the nation—and the Diaspora community 28 —to hold fast to YHWH’s commandments, coupled with dire warnings and predictions of the ensuing

In: Journal for the Study of Judaism

manuscripts but is best known in a version adapted by the Falasha Jews of Ethiopia.38 The date of composition is difficult to determine, but predictions in the work connect with historical events and persons to yield a terminus a quo of 550 c.E.39 The work seems to rely on the Ethiopic Apocafypse of the Yrgin

In: Journal for the Study of Judaism

(Armenian version). 91 43(13): “The Lord said, ‘I will admit them into the Garden and I will anoint them with that unction.’ ” A Synopsis of the Books of Adam and Eve , 45E (Georgian version). 92 M. Stone, “The Angelic Prediction in the Primary Adam Books,” Literature on Adam and Eve , 127. 93 H.E. Gaylord

In: Journal for the Study of Judaism

understood, with its certain knowledge of the past, especially with regard to creation and human evil (Genesis), 27 and the future, predictions of exile and return (Deuteronomy), 28 its event of ascent and revelation (Sinai), 29 and scribal hero (Moses), 30 as something approaching an apocalypse, albeit

In: Journal for the Study of Judaism

diminishing oracular activity at Delphi to "the total defection of the guardian spirits (8at?ovioy?" (418C-D). Philo identifies the divine spirit as an angelic being, similar to the daemons in Cleombrotus' explanation, by drawing a close connection between the prediction of the angel in Vit. Mos. 1.274 and

In: Journal for the Study of Judaism

also emphasizes that prediction of the future would be natural for a dying patriarch 3). Such statements (about revelation of the future as presented in testaments) must, however, be given a rationale in terms of the general understanding which could be presumed for the form testament itself and the

In: Journal for the Study of Judaism

testamentary situation of chapters 15-30 (14,3), however, requires the gathering together of Adam's children from the three parts of the earth (5,3). This gathering is impossible within one day. A far more likely possibility is that the original nar- rative included the prediction that Seth would see his

In: Journal for the Study of Judaism

(1992), 1-38; here quoted from the reprint in: Anderson et al., Literature on Adam and Eve , 3-42, esp. 6-13. 23 M.E. Stone, “The Angelic Prediction in the Primary Adam Books,” in: Anderson et al., Literature on Adam and Eve , 111-131, esp. 121-124. the textual history of the LIFE OF ADAM AND EVE 39

In: Journal for the Study of Judaism

contradictions on that level did not impair group unity. 5 Smith asked: If a group had no single eschatological myth, it cannot have been organized as a community of believers in the myth it did not have. . . . If the variety of eschatological prediction is any evidence, eschatology was, for the members of these

In: Review of Rabbinic Judaism