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), especially pp. 1-32. RRJ 7.1_ f2_1-26 new 9/14/04 2:54 PM Page 10    DABRU EMET 11 trast, ends with the prophet Malachi’s prediction that God will send the prophet Elijah “before the coming of the awesome, fearful day of the Lord.” The latter arrangement makes a nice bridge to John the Baptist

In: Review of Rabbinic Judaism

late Second Temple era as a nuanced, complicated matter with an integrity of its own and not just as a preparation for some new religion. Secondly, the prediction has been based on the blindingly virtuoso work of Geza Vermes. In 1973, Vermes published Jesus the Jew . A Historian’s Reading of the

In: Review of Rabbinic Judaism

astrologers warned Antigonus to expect danger from Seleucus. Other signs and omens of Seleucus’s future greatness are given in Appian, Syr. 9.56 . Was Seleucus already of such importance that astrologers were making predictions about him, or did the Babylonians yearn for his return so much that they

In: Journal for the Study of Judaism

prediction tables called Enūma Anu Enlil is especially important. While they primarily use the verb adāru to describe phenomena of darkness, including the phenomenon of the moon darkening in the middle of the month in tables XV-XXII (lunar eclipse), in tables I-XIII , which deal with a description of

In: Vetus Testamentum

," pp. 20-48, discusses the emergence of the canon of the Hebrew Bible, the royal ideology, the predictions of an ideal king and the transfor- mation of messianism in the Book of Daniel, and tries to answer the question why there was no messianic movement in the Persian and in the early Second Temple

In: Journal for the Study of Judaism

appearance, as well as the parts of darkness and light, characterizing individuals as a function of their date of conception. This is not an individualized prediction (as was argued in many previous commentaries), but a system predicting the category to which the individual types belong as a result of their

In: Journal for the Study of Judaism

exalted goal of astrology. Projecting the nascent distinction between divinatory interpretation of celestial omens and systematic astro- logical prediction onto the axis of human rational evolution, Manilius describes how the human mind then mastered the puzzles of the sky: scientiŽ c observation of

In: Journal for the Study of Judaism

. Judges 5 alludes to historical circumstances, while Num 14:11, 22 briefly relate to the signs [אתות] God performed in Egypt and the wilderness. Finally, when God first reveals Himself to Samuel (cf. 1 Sam 3:1-15) He briefly refers to a prophecy given to Eli (cf. 1 Sam 3:12). Apart from a prediction of

In: Journal for the Study of Judaism

a case of vaticinium ex eventu , as in Dan 10-12 and Or.Sib. 4.40-192. All three texts contain predictions that failed, but    503 © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2005 Journal for the Study of Judaism, XXXVI, 4 Also available online – www.brill.nl JSJ 36,4_343_489-525 10/6/05 7:24 PM

In: Journal for the Study of Judaism

to suppress the interests of the people without their knowledge. He domineered the religio-political ISA by weeding out the representatives of the masses and replacing them with his own lackeys. Another interesting aspect of the pseudo-prediction about Herod is the note that “he will judge them

In: Journal for the Study of Judaism