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Translator: Joep Lameer
The present English translation reproduces the original German of Carl Brockelmann’s Geschichte der Arabischen Litteratur (GAL) as accurately as possible. In the interest of user-friendliness the following emendations have been made in the translation: Personal names are written out in full, except b. for ibn; Brockelmann’s transliteration of Arabic has been adapted to comply with modern standards for English-language publications; modern English equivalents are given for place names, e.g. Damascus, Cairo, Jerusalem, etc.; several erroneous dates have been corrected, and the page references to the two German editions have been retained in the margin, except in the Supplement volumes, where new references to the first two English volumes have been inserted.
The present English translation reproduces the original German of Carl Brockelmann’s Geschichte der Arabischen Litteratur (GAL) as accurately as possible. In the interest of user-friendliness the following emendations have been made in the translation: Personal names are written out in full, except b. for ibn; Brockelmann’s transliteration of Arabic has been adapted to comply with modern standards for English-language publications; modern English equivalents are given for place names, e.g. Damascus, Cairo, Jerusalem, etc.; several erroneous dates have been corrected, and the page references to the two German editions have been retained in the margin, except in the Supplement volumes, where new references to the first two English volumes have been inserted.

‘and more’ with وزباد ‘and civet,’ based on Wuṣla ii 496, which copies it correctly. Zabād is an aromatic secretion of the perineal gland of the African civet. 65 This was also known as qāt ( Catha edulis ); the leaves are chewed, like betel ( tunbul ). It was brought from Qumr in east Africa

In: Treasure Trove of Benefits and Variety at the Table: A Fourteenth-Century Egyptian Cookbook

. They are bay-like leaves that are chewed, like betel ( tunbul ). They are brought from Qumr in east Africa (Comoros Islands). In Kanz recipe 654, it is used in an aromatic oil preparation. Most medieval sources are not quite clear on what it is. They know it as a chewed leaf with a pleasant aroma

In: Treasure Trove of Benefits and Variety at the Table: A Fourteenth-Century Egyptian Cookbook

total, a becoming instead of a being that is mediated by a new Being-with-others, since we are individuals only in social relations with others. Thus, the taxonomic impositions can be said to have backfired. As James Ocita argues, comparing East Africa to South Africa: where Africanisation programmes in

In: Relations and Networks in South African Indian Writing
Author: Felicity Hand

. Govinden Devarakshanam Betty . A Time of Memory: Reflections on Recent South African Writings ( Durban : Solo Collective , 2008 ). Hand Felicity . “ Impossible Burdens: East African Asian Women’s Memoirs ,” Research in African Literatures 42 . 3 ( Fall 2011 ): 100 – 116 . Hassim Aziz . The Lotus

In: Relations and Networks in South African Indian Writing

studies of the cultural productions of the South Asian diaspora. The shady area they occupy in terms of national belonging links them to East African writers of South Asian origin, whose African credentials have frequently been questioned. Arlene A. Elder (1992) provides a careful reading of the short

In: Relations and Networks in South African Indian Writing
Author: Lindy Stiebel

, with few exceptions, Indian South Africans, are South African citizens by birth. 7 Just over twenty years later, Dr. Goonam started her autobiography Coolie Doctor (1991) with the problem of identity: I was born in May Street, in Durban, in 1906 on the southern part of the East African coast. That

In: Relations and Networks in South African Indian Writing
Author: Bernhard Klein

between people and land: seven out of eight galleries on the right depict north and east African Muslim societies, with all figures shown fully dressed wearing kaftans, robes, cloaks or shirts, while only the bottom gallery (“Cafres in Mozambique”) shows four black-skinned Africans (one a baby), of whom

In: English Literature and the Disciplines of Knowledge, Early Modern to Eighteenth Century
Writers of Indian origin seldom appear in the South African literary landscape, although the participation of Indian South Africans in the anti-apartheid struggle was anything but insignificant. The collective experiences of violence and the plea for reconciliation that punctuate the rhythms of post-apartheid South Africa delineate a national script in which ethnic, class, and gender affiliations coalesce and patterns of connectedness between diverse communities are forged. Relations and Networks in South African Indian Writing brings the experience of South African Indians to the fore, demonstrating how their search for identity is an integral part of the national scene’s project of connectedness. By exploring how ‘Indianness’ is articulated in the South African national script through the works of contemporary South African Indian writers, such as Aziz Hassim, Ahmed Essop, Farida Karodia, Achmat Dangor, Shamim Sarif, Ronnie Govender, Rubendra Govender, Neelan Govender, Tholsi Mudly, Ashwin Singh, and Imraan Coovadia, along with the prison memoirists Dr Goonam and Fatima Meer, the book offers a theoretical model of South–South subjectivities that is deeply rooted in the Indian Ocean world and its cosmopolitanisms. Relations and Networks demonstrates convincingly the permeability of identity that is the marker of the Indian Ocean space, a space defined by ‘relations and networks’ established within and beyond ethnic, class, and gender categories.


CONTRIBUTORS
Isabel Alonso–Breto, M.J. Daymond, Felicity Hand, Salvador Faura, Farhad Khoyratty, Esther Pujolràs–Noguer, J. Coplen Rose, Modhumita Roy, Lindy Stiebel, Juan Miguel Zarandona