Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 23 items for :

  • All: "Neo-Russian Style" x
  • 限定主要语言: English x
Clear All

obvious that “fantastic flowers and grasses [. . .] coil and interwine;” there are “swamp grasses, pebbles and algae—all highly stylized;” all are set against the background of “dark night,” “clouds,” and “stars.” The work was commissioned as part of a decorative scheme for a dining room in the neo-Russian

In: Experiment

Hands], constructed by the members of the Abramtsevo circle (1881-82, designed by Viktor Vasnetsov and Vasilii Polenov), and its chapel (1892, designed by Viktor Vasnetsov) became the first exemplars of the Neo-Russian style in the history of Russian architecture, an important constituent of stil

In: Experiment

the style of Scandinavian Art Nouveau at the estate he founded on the banks of the Oka River near Tula; and his only urban project—the House of Theatrical Enlightenment in Moscow. Polenov pursued the Neo-Russian style with particular alacrity in the sphere of church architecture, which is the focus of

In: Experiment

workshop—the first workshop studio to be established at the estate in 1876, which would later also house the ceramics studio—was erected in Abramtsevo in 1873. 4 It was designed by the architect Viktor Eduard Gartman, who became one of the main architects of the Neo-Russian style. At first, the ceramics

In: Experiment

fertile and universal field for artistic experimentation at the turn of the twentieth century and, moreover, served as one of the sources for the formation of the National Romantic trend, the so-called “Neo-Russian style,” in Russian Art Nouveau [ stil modern ]? In discussing this, it is necessary to

In: Experiment

The Neo-Russian Style and Civilian Dress under Tsar Alexander II The Russian (or Neo-Russian) style was formed during the reign of Tsar Alexander III (1881-94) and with his direct participation. However, the idea of the Neo-Russian style had begun to manifest itself earlier, during the reign of

In: Experiment

close of the nineteenth century was increasingly viewed as a hallmark theme of the Neo-Russian style. Decked out in bright and exotic garments, embellished headdresses and resplendent jewelry, the underwater maidens in Repin’s painting represent different female types and ethnicities, and in that sense

In: Experiment

art exhibits designed by Maria Vasilievna Iakunchikova for the Paris “Exposition Universelle” of 1900. Unrefined and heavy-looking, its folkish Neo-Russian style clearly attracted some interest, for it was awarded a silver medal by the exhibition jury. 1 Yet despite the accolade and the prominent

In: Experiment

collective work of the Mamontov circle members—the Church of the Savior Not Made by Human Hands and the “Hut on Chicken Legs”—determined the origins of the Neo-Russian style, a national Romantic branch of Russian Art Nouveau. Mikhail Vrubel’s ceramics, produced at Abramtsevo, in many ways influenced the

In: Experiment

of the Neo-Russian style, to undertake the investigation and preservation of lace as he feared this needle-art was losing its prestige throughout the empire. 1 Davydova undertook the task with genuine enthusiasm and traveled “[the] length and breadth of Russia to study, in detail, one of the most

In: Experiment