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Edited by Jan P. Hogendijk, Kim Plofker, Michio Yano and Charles Burnett

This collection of essays reflects the wide range of David Pingree's expertise in the scientific texts (above all, concerning astronomy and astrology) of Ancient Mesopotamia, Greece, India, Persia, and the medieval Arabic, Hebrew and Latin traditions. Both theoretical aspects and the practical applications of the exact sciences-in time keeping, prediction of the future, and the operation of magic-are dealt with.
The book includes several critical editions and translations of hitherto unknown or understudied texts, and a particular emphasis is on the diffusion of scientific learning from one culture to another, and through time.
Above all, the essays show the variety and sophistication of the exact sciences in non-Western societies in pre-modern times.

Abū Ma‘šar on Historical Astrology: The Book of Religions and Dynasties (On the Great Conjunctions) (2 vols)

Volume I: The Arabic original: Abū Ma‘šar, K. al-Milal wa d-duwal (The Book on Religions and Dynasties). Arabic text edited by Keiji Yamamoto, with an English translation by Keiji Yamamoto and Charles Burnett. Volume II: The Latin Versions: Albumas

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Edited by Yamamoto and Charles Burnett

These two volumes provide the Arabic, Latin and English text of the major work on historical astrology of the Middle Ages. The text is attributed either to Abū Ma‘šar (787-886) or to his pupil Ibn al-Bāzyār, and was translated into Latin in the mid-twelfth century. In eight books (parts) it provides the scientific basis for predictions concerning kings, prophets, dynasties, religions, wars, epidemics etc., by means of conjunctions of planets, comets and other astronomical factors.
It is cited frequently by both Arabic and Latin authors. These editions will provide, for the first time, the context of these citations. Aside from its intrinsic interest for cultural history and the history of science, this work provides several details.