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prophecy. Catalysing the general trend, Meyer included as prophecy Josephus’ prediction about Vespasian and many similar phenomena. From such evidence he concluded: “There never was in Israel a prophetic age,” but prophecy only changed its form through the Second Temple period and beyond. 28 Jeremias, by

In: Journal for the Study of Judaism

Assyria. Tobit’s home in the Galilee is brutally attacked by the Assyrians, and Tobit nearly loses his life in Nineveh. Yet the story ends with a prediction of a rebuilt Israel where the Gentiles are no longer enemies but worshippers of the same God. As part of this theme death and chaos manifest not only

In: Delicious Prose: Reading the Tale of Tobit with Food and Drink

the difference that whereas this Hannah worries her son is dead, the biblical Hannah mourns that she has no son at all. The other parallel with the biblical Hannah is that her prediction of the barren having seven children (1 Sam. 2:5) is later paralleled by Tobit and (formerly barren) Sarah’s seven

In: Delicious Prose: Reading the Tale of Tobit with Food and Drink

. Moreover, familiarity with Isaiah’s language is not surprising in Ben Sira, either. Michael A. Knibb suggests these alternative word choices indicate apocalyptic predictions he says are absent in Isaiah. Knibb’s argument for an apocalyptic reading of this line depends upon an interpretation of the meaning

In: Scribal Culture in Ben Sira