Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 48 items for :

  • All: "subject" x
  • Youth & Adolescence x
  • Primary Language: English x
Clear All

The Art of Instruction

Essays on Pedagogy and Literature in 17th-Century France

Series:

Edited by Anne L. Birberick

The Art of Instruction: Essays on Pedagogy and Literature in 17th-Century France aims to add a new dimension to the scholarly discussion on how culture is inculcated by focusing on the interplay between aesthetic forms and pedagogical agendas. The nine essays in the collection take into account the full range of meanings associated with the term art: science, method, learning, beautiful expression, artistic creation. In exploring the role art plays in shaping an instructional system, the volume’s contributors examine literary genres that are both established (comedies, tragedies, sonnets) and nascent (novels, manuals, gazettes) as well as the works of a diverse group of seventeenth-century writers: Chassignet, Subligny, Scarron, Lafayette, La Bruyère, Maintenon, de Visé, Boursault, Molière and Racine. What emerges from this diversity is an invaluable exploration of how educational imperatives, no matter their focus, rely as much on manipulating artistic forms as they do on articulating didactic principles. Broad in its scope while remaining thematically coherent, The Art of Instruction will be of interest to students and scholars of early modern French literature, history, culture and pedagogy.

Closed Education in the Open Society

Kibbutz Education as a Case Study

Series:

Chen Yehezkely

Why is education in the open society not open? Why is this option not even considered in the debate over which education is most suited for the open society? Many consider such an option irresponsible. What, then, are the minimal responsibilities of education?
The present volume raises these questions and many more. It is a book we have been waiting for. It offers a rare combination of two seemingly opposite, unyielding attitudes: critical and friendly. Dr. Yehezkely applies a rigorous fallibilist-critical approach to issues regarding contemporary education. His diagnosis is that the source of our trouble is the closed undemocratic character of education, which causes education to become, in effect, a fifth column in the open democratic society. Following Popper, he concedes that democracy is every bit as flawed and as problematic as its enemies accuse it of being, particularly in education; still it is our only hope, since open responsible debate of vital problems cannot do without it. Democracy is risky: yet its absence guarantees failure, especially in closed undemocratic education, even when inspired by the most progressive ideas extant, charged with tremendous good will, and executed with selfless love and devotion. Kibbutz education is a case in point.

Namrata Jain

Childhood is for every child. It is marked by age and being. However, it is also the turning of a child into a gendered subject. The privileges of innocence and ignorance also bring in tow the hegemony of the adult and its ideology. Concordantly, children become the miniature ground for adult politics. In other words, turning children into gendered subjects, the society ensures its own longevity in terms of norms and codes of behaviour and social status or space. As a result, childhood becomes a prey of gender politics. On the other hand, class politics operate upon a child, declaring childhood to be a luxury. The coupling of gender and class brings to fore the marginalised state of a working class girl child.

Mhairi Cowden and Joanne C. Lau

The terms capacity and competence play a central role in moral and political philosophy by determining the moral status of a subject. More specifically, they play a primary role in the determination of rights, especially in the literature on children’s rights. Despite their importance, these terms are often used interchangeably, or not defined at all. This leads to confusion regarding their application and significance, particularly when using the terms to determine the rights of the child. In this chapter, we propose a distinction between capacity and competence that will help to address and clarify the debates in the literature. We then introduce the additional concepts of ableness. Finally, we argue that these concepts, distinguished in this way, can help to address future research within the field of children’s rights.

Series:

Mualla Selçuk

Within the pluralistic character of society and the modern school, students are seeking a different kind of understanding about the relationship between their religious traditions and life. This affects Islamic religious education in many aspects, including its aims, its programs, and approach to teaching in the classroom. Recently, religious education has not been an activity of faith transfer but a matter of passing on new perspectives into the context in which the individual stands. Therefore, the teachers should strive to teach their students to live with the demands of plurality and modernity present in their world today. This paper will advance some insights on the methodological problem of communicating the Qur’anic text by introducing a communicative model of teaching in teacher training. The communicative model of teaching is a kind of reflection on the text of the Qur’an within the subject in its historical and contemporary contexts. It starts from the question: What is textual and what is contextual? This paper aims to present a communicative model of teaching, taking the Qur’anic concept of “people of the book” as an example.

Vicky Anderson-Patton

‘Children enter schools as questions marks and leave schools as periods.’ As this quote indicates, schools are entrenched in boundaries and rules which undermine students’ natural curiosity for learning, risk taking, and creative expression. Educators have recognised the need for social and emotional boundaries in the classroom since Maslow and Rogers’s writings. If a student does not feel psychologically safe in the classroom then it is unlikely that s/he will open up to answer questions, take risks, or even participate in the learning process. American students are frequently subjected to one standardised curricula, where teachers must be on the same page simultaneously, indifferent to students’ learning needs, multiple intelligence strengths, cultural/linguistic/socioeconomic diversity, and interests. Clearly these rigid curricula boundaries are ineffective. They undermine students’ confidence and self-esteem, forcing their creativity underground. Students become focused on extrinsic motivation - teachers’ feedback and the copious test scores inundating them (PSSAs, Terra Novas, Bench mark, SATs), which reinforce inflexible boundaries. Conversely, innovative thinking, and problem solving skills are considered the essential workplace qualities American workers currently require to remain forefront in the competitive job market. This demands students’ education be scaffolded utilising flexible curricula boundaries, where teaching can be individualised to maximise each student’s potential. Educators must understand students’ strengths, weaknesses and cultural boundaries, and how these may impact individual and group learning. Additionally, educators must recognise their own teaching and learning strengths, multiple intelligence profiles, as we all teach from our strengths. Furthermore, through careful observations, data collection, feedback, self-study and reflection educators must be aware of their own boundaries, and how these affect classroom climate. They must distinguish between boundaries that support academic and social growth and those that undermine intellectual curiosity, creative expression/problem solving, and consider how boundaries affect student learning. Educators must stretch themselves beyond their teaching comfort zones, thus modelling flexible boundaries to students.

Phenomenology and Education

Cosmology, Co-Being, and Core Curriculum

Series:

Michael M. Kazanjian

Phenomenologists or Continental thinkers argue for the subject-object continuum. For phenomenology, subjectivity is of the object, and object is for the subject. This book applies that continuum to the holistic foundations of work or specialization. The author devotes a chapter to each of eight cultural applications of the subject-object continuum. Chapter One examines the specialist-generalist continuum meaning specialization for general education. That continuum comprises the framework for the remaining seven chapters. Those seven include production for community, design for user, automation for user, computing for society, taxation for society, information for manufacturing, and procedure for goal. These eight applications constitute the basis for a core curriculum. The core curriculum gives holistic meaning, order, or cosmos to all jobs and to all people. Cosmos is a Greek word meaning humanistic-scientific order, irreducible to physics. The core curriculum is fundamental cosmology. Each of the eight continuities follow in a logical, systematic manner from the analytic-subjective continuum meaning object for subjectivity. Phenomenology of education can become the human basis of a promising holistic logic, bringing together analytic and existential themes.