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blogging prior to the 2003 invasion, tells us that the whole thing started as a joke, and Riverbend says that she wanted to start a rant blog. In a 2003 letter to the American journalist Jeff Jarvis, Healing Iraq weblog author Zeyad explained his reasons for blogging: “I mainly followed Salam, G

In: Culture and Dialogue

brings about an experiential reductio ad absurdum of this delusion offering thus the “patient” the possibility of healing. Western Epistemology and the Fallibility of Science Among Hume’s “findings” most relevant to us at this point is the universally accepted objection to empirical science as

In: Culture and Dialogue

, drama, poetry, movement, dreams, and visual arts together, in an integrated way, to foster human growth, development, and healing. Such a therapy allows us to reclaim our innate capacity for creative expression of our individual and collective human experience. Expressive arts therapy is also about

In: Culture and Dialogue

: Mapping a minefi eld. Human Rights Review 2, 46-63. —— (2002). Healing the cycles of humiliation: How to attend to the emotional aspects of “unsolvable” confl icts and the use of “humiliation entrepreneurship.” Peace and Confl ict: Jour- nal of Psychology 8, 125-138. Margalit, A. (2002). Th e

In: Journal of Cognition and Culture

, it is the god who seduces Xochiquetzal and the man who seduces the woman, while in the healing ritual, it is Xochiquetzal who seduces the god. As we will see shortly, this double direction of the seduction opens the way for varied applications of the archetypical action of seduction, all the more so

In: Journal of Cognition and Culture

the Greek healing centre of Askelapios (Aesculapius) there was an unusual building for which no function has yet been found. It is round, built of stone and within there is a stone maze. Maze construction has resurfaced in the 20th and 21st centuries in unexpected ways. An 18m (60 ft) maze was created

In: Culture and Dialogue

Religion. Biology and Philosophy , 18, 655-686. ——. (2006). Nature’s Medicine: empirical constraint and the evolution of religious healing. In P. MacNamara (Ed.), Where Man and God Meet: the new sciences of religion and brain , pp. 87-121. Greenwood Publishers, Westwood, CT. ——. (2007). Evolution and

In: Journal of Cognition and Culture

their KB , or when they are simply unable to clearly formulate them, as often occurs in healing or in expert-layperson interaction more generally. Minimal shared recognition of intentions is still maintained in these contexts. The logic is thus cooperative in a technical sense: the parties seek to

In: Journal of Cognition and Culture
Silence exists at the edge of the world, where words break off and meaning fades into ambiguity. The numerous treatments of silence in Steven L. Bindeman’s Silence in Philosophy, Literature, and Art question the misleading clarity of certainty, which persists in the unreflective discourse of common experience. Significant philosophical problems, such as the limits of language, the perception of sound and the construction of meaning, the dynamics of the social realm, and the nature of the human self, all appear differently as a consequence of this questioning. Silence is shown to have two modes, disruptive and healing, which work together as complementary stages within a creative process. The interaction between these two modes of silence serves as the dynamic behind the entire work.
A New Philosophy of the Other
This book makes compassionate caring and connectedness the central themes. Imbedded in the human psyche we find a deep yearning for connection. This book explores the many roadblocks that human beings put in the way of a healthy and respectful dialogue with each other, with nature, and with the universe. It also cites numerous examples from literature, philosophy, and society of a reawakening sense of connectedness.