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Devising New Stage Idioms
In the years that followed the end of apartheid, South African theatre was characterized by a remarkable productivity, which resulted in a process of constant aesthetic reinvention. After 1994, the “protest” theatre template of the apartheid years morphed into a wealth of diverse forms of stage idioms, detectable in the works of Greg Homann, Mike van Graan, Craig Higginson, Lara Foot, Omphile Molusi, Nadia Davids, Magnet Theatre, Rehane Abrahams, Amy Jephta, and Reza de Wet, to cite only a few prominent examples. Marc and Jessica Maufort’s multivocal edited volume documents some of the various ways in which the “rainbow” nation has forged these innovative stage idioms. This book’s underlying assumption is that creolization reflects the processes of identity renegotiation in contemporary South Africa and their multi-faceted theatrical representations.

Contributors: Veronica Baxter, Marcia Blumberg, Vicki Briault Manus, Petrus du Preez, Paula Fourie, Craig Higginson, Greg Homann, Jessica Maufort, Marc Maufort, Omphile Molusi, Jessica Murray, Jill Planche, Ksenia Robbe, Mathilde Rogez, Chris Thurman, Mike van Graan, and Ralph Yarrow.

and Thuli and Themba’s reconciliation. Themba apologizes to his wife for causing her so much pain and promises her that he is prepared to do anything she wants, that he will be a good husband and father and man, that he will “do everything right this time” (162). He implies that he will take an hiv

In: Global Healing

irreversible change to South Africa, and no ‘normal’ remedy or action is possible” (2011: 63–64). For more on the importance of storytelling as a means of reconciliation in South African fiction see Knapp (2006) and Hunter-Gault (2012) . 13 Likewise, in “J·M·Kuttsē shi no sairainichi ni yosete,” Tajiri

In: Global Healing

Transition Assistance Group) are strong indicators of apartheid’s slow demise within Namibia’s borders. Here, the focus is on the returning people, those who fled or fought—basically those who lived in exile for long stretches of time. The idea of reconciliation is central, as those who were away needed to

In: Matatu

the future generations though? That’s it is (sic) okay to blot out pieces of history that we deem inappropriate? If it irks you, just get a bulldozer and remove it? It’s almost as if we just slowly pulled away the hand of national reconciliation. It’s clear there are still remnants of bottled emotions

In: Matatu

grenade. Freedom Park, by contrast—though it cost far more than Heroes Acre, funding drawn in part from a so-called state ‘reconciliation package’—is relatively low-key, being hardly visible from nearby vantage points. Lacking huge statuary, it is an open site that blends into the landscape. In a sense a

In: Matatu

, the spirit of reconciliation in 1990 was reflected in Gordimer’s comment on Goosen’s book that “the time has come to garner all aspects of South African experience,” as well as in the observation of Albie Sachs of the ANC that Goosen had “captured the psyche of present-day South Africa with humanity

In: Matatu

silence regarding the bloody events in the history of the ANC ’s fight for freedom, will reconciliation be possible and enduring. This is the simple but key message of Mhlongo’s novel. The fact that reconciliation does not occur in Way Back Home , however, is a bitter testimony that Mhlongo issues to

In: Matatu

details of what happened to people, and searching for ways of coping with the trauma of war. In the drive for national reconciliation and development, we sometimes forget that we can only really move forward when we have come to terms with the past. For that to happen, we have to know it and name it

In: Matatu

parties to a dispute would come for help to resolve their problems and reach reconciliation. This is the definition of the ‘peacekeeper’ as told to Mama Penee as a child, and it always ended with the following verse: ‘Tji mwa kaengwango—hiyoo; Twendee Koya Nguvi—hiyoo; Nguvi wa re omutêna Kwenâ ramwenu

In: Matatu