Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 100 of 1,762 items for :

  • All: chinese x
  • Type: Major Reference Work x
  • American Studies x
  • Reference Work x
  • Primary Language: English x
Clear All Modify Search
California Sojourns in Five Installations
Site-Seeing Aesthetics: California Sojourns in Five Installations takes the reader to Dodger Stadium, Fort Ross, Chinese Camp, the Winchester House, and letters from the Gold Country in a writing and reading of cultural time and site performance. These sojourns’ are informed by insights from among other literary and cultural studies, site-specific performance studies, human geography, archeology, and history into a kind of “literary chorography.” Along the road, the book considers how places come before us as dramatized, hybrid creations of layered and “haunted” scripts. In its interdisciplinary nature, Site-Seeing in California thus gestures to alternate paths into our time’s fascination with place, region, and memory, engaging also with questions of and dialogues between region and transnationalism in their aesthetic reflections.

divisive even today. 15 By the 1890 s Australians decided they wanted to have a more homogeneous white society, and, therefore, legislated to prevent immigration of Chinese, Indian, and Japanese, as well as Pacific lslanders. 16 Since the Australians still wanted to produce their own sugar, even without

In: Journal of Global Slavery
Author: Benedetta Rossi

-produced objects from China and Nigeria on Niger’s markets. While in the 1920s and 1930s their monopoly of these crafts constituted a concrete avenue of social mobility, since the 1980s they have been finding it harder and harder to meet their subsistence needs by practicing traditional crafts. Avenues of economic

In: Journal of Global Slavery

trace a unique route from the Adriatic Sea region of the European middle ages to the Ming-Qing period of late imperial China, and from the French colony of Saint-Domingue in the Caribbean around 1700 to the Tahoua region of contemporary Niger in West Africa. The first article, by Juliane Schiel

In: Journal of Global Slavery

1 Introduction Over the past decades, “wage labor” has been a lingering issue in studies on the development patterns of late imperial China. The legal reconfiguration of the category of “hired laborers” ( gugong 僱工), in particular, has been foregrounded as a salient

In: Journal of Global Slavery
Author: Tatiana Seijas

discrete topic—the cultural tastes of people who purchased goods from China and Japan—is based on an analysis of wills and testaments, account books, personal letters, and more. An appendix provides details on the book’s primary sources. The introduction contains a short overview of Manila, Mexico City

In: New West Indian Guide / Nieuwe West-Indische Gids
Authors: Richard Price and Sally Price

“Sometime around 1935 [in Suriname], my Catholic grandmother with her Chinese name and her Hindu indentured ancestors met my grandfather, the child of a German man and his Creole concubine and the descendant of enslaved Africans, and fell in love.” Her book recounts her efforts to delve deeply into her

In: New West Indian Guide / Nieuwe West-Indische Gids
Author: Sally Price

ritual, but aimed at (and realized with the help of) participants from all the ethnic groups who lived along the river, from Javanese and Chinese to Creoles and Amerindians. As described by Brazilian anthropologist Olívia Gomes da Cunha, it constituted “a composition of practices decontextualized from

In: New West Indian Guide / Nieuwe West-Indische Gids
Author: John Ermer

, and while contributors do consider future scenarios, they do not claim to wield excessive powers of prophesy. The first of the book’s three parts, “Economics,” evaluates Cuban economic reforms since the fall of the Soviet Union, comparing them with the experiences of China and the East Asian

In: New West Indian Guide / Nieuwe West-Indische Gids
Read an interview with Karen Thornber.

In Global Healing: Literature, Advocacy, Care, Karen Laura Thornber analyzes how narratives from diverse communities globally engage with a broad variety of diseases and other serious health conditions and advocate for empathic, compassionate, and respectful care that facilitates healing and enables wellbeing.

The three parts of this book discuss writings from Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe, the Middle East, and Oceania that implore societies to shatter the devastating social stigmas which prevent billions from accessing effective care; to increase the availability of quality person-focused healthcare; and to prioritize partnerships that facilitate healing and enable wellbeing for both patients and loved ones.

Thornber’s Global Healing remaps the contours of comparative literature, world literature, the medical humanities, and the health humanities.

Watch a video interview with Thornber by the Mahindra Humanities Center, part of their conversations on Covid-19.

Read an interview with Thornber on Brill's Humanities Matter blog.

Arab, Persian, Chinese, Malay, Indonesian and Indian traders even before the colonial period. When illustrating music genres, it is simply not adequate to write or speak about melodies, rhythms and songs. The best method of communicating is through live music. In this respect, the film highlights

In: Journal of Global Slavery

( aids ). It then turns to discussion of the disease, stigmas against the disease, and literary engagement with the disease in the United States, China, and several nations in sub-Saharan Africa (South Africa, Tanzania, and Kenya), sites that are distinctive but also share much in common with

In: Global Healing

the disease. These texts all implore their audiences to overpower stigma, if not eradicate it and in so doing change the course of hiv / aids within their communities and far beyond. For their part, Kenyan writer Meja Mwangi’s (1948–) novel The Last Plague (2000) and Chinese writer Yan Lianke

In: Global Healing

patients were reported missing in Japan in 2018 ( Koizumi 2019 ). For its part, China is projected to have more than 20 million dementia sufferers by 2040; today it is estimated that more than 10 million Chinese have a form of dementia ( The Globalist 2019 ). In the U.K., it is estimated that by 2021 more

In: Global Healing

). Rayment appears just as distressed at not being told he would lose his knee as at having lost it. Rayment is only slightly better off than Mo Fei, of the Chinese writer Shi Tiesheng’s (史铁生, 1951–2010) short story “Yuanzui suming” (原罪·宿命, Original Sin – Fate, 1987). In “Fate,” the second part of this short

In: Global Healing

hiv / aids . Chapter 2 discusses the disease, stigmas against it, and literary engagement with it in the United States, China, and parts of sub-Saharan Africa (South Africa, Tanzania, and Kenya). This provides context for Chapter 3, which examines global literature on hiv / aids particularly from

In: Global Healing

.g., China’s call to “nurture the elderly,” 养老) seek to improve healing and wellbeing, it goes without saying that most people, at some point in their lives, will need care for a serious health condition. 14 Providing care is rapidly becoming a normative experience in societies globally ( Levine 2014 : 1

In: Global Healing

of global literature on the patient’s right to refuse medical intervention: Chinese writer Li Shijiang’s (李师江, 1974–) short story “Yiyuan” (医院, The Hospital, 2006), British dramatist Brian Clark’s (1932–) Whose Life Is It Anyway? (1978), American physician Dr. Terrence Holt’s memoir Internal

In: Global Healing

with counterparts globally. 10 From Chile to China, Japan to Australia, India to Serbia, and the United States to South Africa, writings in countless languages and genres have called on individuals, families, communities, societies, and nations confronting diseases and other adverse health conditions

In: Global Healing

). Conditions were brutal there, with many living in extreme poverty and starvation not unknown. Residents were also subjected to medical experiments (ibid.). Ninety percent of Hawai‘i’s leprosy patients were Kānaka Maoli (Native Hawaiians, descendants of the Polynesians), but Chinese also were quarantined, as

In: Global Healing

more acute than chronic, many of the insights into treatment that these narratives provide also apply to chronic conditions. And so before turning to Watanabe’s and Pak Wansŏ’s narratives, select translations of these works into Chinese, English, Indonesian, Urdu, and Spanish, and related narratives, I

In: Global Healing

example, in the past three years in the state of Maharashtra, India, alone, more than forty-five health professionals have been attacked by the relatives of patients ( Pandit 2017 ). Another prominent example of a patient attacking health professionals was the 2012 murder of Chinese rheumatologist Dr

In: Global Healing

of sharing diagnoses and prognoses with the patient’s family but withholding information from patients. Yet he also points out that it was not until the 1970s that medical truth-telling became standard procedure in the West. Even more notably, medical truth-telling is not culturally alien to China