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California Sojourns in Five Installations
Site-Seeing Aesthetics: California Sojourns in Five Installations takes the reader to Dodger Stadium, Fort Ross, Chinese Camp, the Winchester House, and letters from the Gold Country in a writing and reading of cultural time and site performance. These sojourns’ are informed by insights from among other literary and cultural studies, site-specific performance studies, human geography, archeology, and history into a kind of “literary chorography.” Along the road, the book considers how places come before us as dramatized, hybrid creations of layered and “haunted” scripts. In its interdisciplinary nature, Site-Seeing in California thus gestures to alternate paths into our time’s fascination with place, region, and memory, engaging also with questions of and dialogues between region and transnationalism in their aesthetic reflections.

strata conjured up from under Dodger Stadium, in the references to long gone camps on the frail paper of Wilson’s letters, in Chinese Camp’s overgrown, half-hidden, semi-ghostly presentation, and in the fragment of a momentous history that Fort Ross stands for, we are confronted with how “[r]uins makes

In: Site-Seeing Aesthetics

degrees of latitude, one of the most beautiful and fertile in the world and hitherto more or less unpopulated, is now being visibly transformed into a rich, civilized land thickly populated by men of all races, from the Yankee to the Chinese, from the Negro to the Indian and Malay, from the Creole and

In: Site-Seeing Aesthetics

of sight-seeing. Granted, Chinese Camp gets the odd visitors interested in its semi-ghostliness, and Dodger Stadium of course has many a visitor who also sees it as an aesthetic object, not only a ballpark with all the accompanying functions. Those locations have in common that they activate their

In: Site-Seeing Aesthetics

a multitemporal mix which is the fundamental texture of our human social experience. pearson and shanks 2001 , xvii Before entering Chinese Camp, a semi-ghost town in California’s Gold Country, I want to return for a minute to Stegner’s “The Sense of Place.” The distinction he makes there

In: Site-Seeing Aesthetics

traversals through the Gold Country in California between 1849 and 1855. We are consequently not moving all that far away from Chinese Camp, but will here be more concerned with the larger region in the moment of its narrative inception as that mythical destiny for dreamers it would so quickly aspire to be

In: Site-Seeing Aesthetics

and stands as a veritable monument to the complex history that the structure of the Stadium overwrites, and to what the razed neighborhood in its very early years was home to. The singer-narrators of “Chinito” are a couple of young women presumably standing on a corner and teasing the Chinese laundry

In: Site-Seeing Aesthetics

Chavez Ravine as it is actuated on the site of Dodger Stadium, Chinese Camp in curation, the aesthetics of the yellowed letters and their chorographic attitude to the space they chronicle, or Sarah’s House and the “little event” that it is. In all cases actual, concrete place determines the performance

In: Site-Seeing Aesthetics

railroad station master, he had it much better because he could send me to Tarutung, to school. In Bekala, there were no Christian families. I don’t remember that we ever went to a church there. We had our service in a school. I think it was a Chinese Methodist School, in a place like a shop. They used

In: The Memorykeepers: Gendered Knowledges, Empires, and Indonesian American History

her of childhood Photograph by Author Yet another set of recreated artifacts is Rony’s collection of Delft-style figurines and plates, the blue and white china figures of windmills, children, and other items inspired by the renowned manufacturers in the Netherlands. While she has a few of

In: The Memorykeepers: Gendered Knowledges, Empires, and Indonesian American History

Indonesia and concerned about its susceptibility to Communist control. The US also weighed the potential impact to its interests if there were shifts in the regional power balance, especially due to possible alliances with China or the Soviet Union. In fact, Indonesia was a location of direct competition

In: The Memorykeepers: Gendered Knowledges, Empires, and Indonesian American History

provide milk to feed the babies. And when he came home, he told me the story. And I said, “Pa, why don’t you at least take one, I will take care of it.” He said, “Where are you going to get milk? The babies need milk to live and grow up.” And then later on, I heard that the babies died. This was a Chinese

In: The Memorykeepers: Gendered Knowledges, Empires, and Indonesian American History

remarry, as well as the significance of having a communal support system available. Similarly, Rony recalled a childhood story of her father delivering twin girls for a Chinese Indonesian family during the Japanese Occupation, and the family requesting that her father take them into his household. The

In: The Memorykeepers: Gendered Knowledges, Empires, and Indonesian American History

compounded by our diversity in ethnicity and originating region, which also results in a varied range of languages, religions, and home cultures. This makes a difference in our ability to be ‘seen’ and recognized as ‘Indonesian.’ For example, there are sizeable numbers of Chinese Indonesian Americans in the

In: The Memorykeepers: Gendered Knowledges, Empires, and Indonesian American History

did not return to Pearaja again for ten years. In the intervening period, I was busy with a new job at the New York Chinatown History Project, now the Museum of the Chinese in the Americas, and then I went back to Yale to begin graduate school. I saw my grandmother a few times when she visited the

In: The Memorykeepers: Gendered Knowledges, Empires, and Indonesian American History

our own country. Eurasians and Chinese and also those Indonesians serving in the army were considered first-class citizens. I felt the discrimination clearly. Although the teacher didn’t treat us differently because there were only two of us Indonesians in my third-grade class, the other students made

In: The Memorykeepers: Gendered Knowledges, Empires, and Indonesian American History
Author: James I. Matray

, Sheila Miyoshi Jager, and Masuda Hajimu added important works on the Korean War, but most recently Monica Kim in The Interrogation Rooms of the Korean War: The Untold History (2019) and David Cheng Chang in The Hijacked War: The Story of Chinese POWs in the Korean War (2020) have examined the

In: Journal of American-East Asian Relations
Author: Sunwoo Lee

choose an ideology was to choose a country. However, the pow  s had minimal experience of a living in a modern nation state, and hardly were aware of the grave consequences of their decisions. But they had to choose, and the statistical result was 22,607 Chinese and Korean non-repatriates. Eighty

In: Journal of American-East Asian Relations

The Korean War broke out seventy years ago, resulting in three years of mass destruction and killing. More than 36,000 Americans, 180,000 Chinese, and millions of North and South Koreans were killed in the war. Unlike the official and popular remembrance of World War ii , commemorations of the

In: Journal of American-East Asian Relations

David Cheng Chang David Cheng Chang is associate professor of history at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. He received a Ph.D. in Modern Chinese History from the University of California, San Diego. He studies the history of the Korean War, World War II interpreters, the

In: Journal of American-East Asian Relations
Author: Jung Byung Joon

Korea, or the anti-Communists in South Korea. Under the terms of the armistice, these pow s could reject repatriation. The vast majority of non-repatriates chose to reside in either of the Koreas, the People’s Republic of China ( prc ), or Taiwan. But a small group exercised the option to go to

In: Journal of American-East Asian Relations
Author: Jung Keun Sik

located at the Douglas MacArthur Memorial Library and Archives in Norfolk, VA, which is in English with the names of people or places in Chinese characters as well. The number of his interrogation report is atis (Allied Translator and Interpreter Section) 2338, dated 22 November 1950. His field report

In: Journal of American-East Asian Relations