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La Vente internationale de Marchandises et le Conflit de Lois, Michel Pelichet

The principal subject of the course of Michel Pelichet, Deputy Secretary-General of the Hague Conference on private international law, is the study of the The Hague Convention of 1986, which is a revision of the one of 1955. Michel Pelichet devotes the first part of his course to examine the reasons which led the Hague Conference to create a revised version of the 1955 Convention. These reasons are conceptual and historical in nature and are indicative of the spirit which reigned at the end of the 1960s, particularly regarding the place occupied by private international law in the unification process of substantive law.
The second part of the course provides an analysis of the 1986 Convention and its relation to the Convention of Vienna of 1980.



« Good offices » in international relations in the light of Swiss Practice and Experience, Raymond R. Probst

Raymond Probst, former Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs in Bern, develops his course on good offices in international relations in the light of Swiss practice and experiences in nine chapters. The first chapter is devoted to the notion of "Good Offices". In the second chapter, the author studies the relation between neutrality and good offices. In the next chapter, he reviews in detail the Swiss experience in the field. In the next chapters, the author examines the Swiss arbitral activity on the basis of peace treaties, good offices of a political nature, the notion of protecting power, the mandate of protecting power and the new forms of general good offices.


United Nations Peace-keeping Operations: Their Importance and Their Limitations in a Polarized World

(Speech)

Fou-Tchin Liu

In this speech, Fou-Tchin Liu, former UN Assistant Secretary-General for Special Political Affairs draws attention to the importance and the limitations of the United Nations peace-keeping operations in a polarized world. By way of encouragement and conclusion he reminds us that the Treaty of Paris of 1783, which opened the way to reconciliation between Great Britain and the United States, was achieved only after extremely difficult negotiations.