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B.J. Spruyt

over gods- dienst in het algemeen zou spreken over islamitische of de joodse godsdienst. J. J. Woltjer BOEKBEOORDELINGEN/REVIEWS Manfred P. Fleischer, ed., The Harvest of Humanism in Central Europe. Essays in Honor of Lewis W. Spitz, St. Louis: Concordia, 1992, 389 pp., cloth, $19.95; ISBN 0

Stefan Ehrenpreis

-called "French schools" in the Dutch Republic trained businessmen, craftsmen, and even women of the Dutch social elite in French language and culture. In central Europe the Reformed were engaged in a large number of small academies, which were influential in politics, law, and mend- icine. The situation of

M.E.H.N. Mout

-century history. Central European coun- tries like Bohemia, Poland, Hungary and Transylvania are at worst ignored, at best given a modest nook. This is not at all in keeping with the image the Calvinists in those lands had of themselves. They considered themselves part of an international Calvinist world in which

J.J. Woltjer

Humanism in Central Europe. Essays in Honor of Lewis W. Spitz, St. Louis: Concordia, 1992, 389 pp., cloth, $19.95; ISBN 0-570-04565-7. Among the treasures preserved in the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the four predella panels by Sandro Botticelli easily stand out. They depict the life of Mary Magdalene and

Bert Loonstra

the Netherlands are the countries that figure most frequently in its sixteenth- and seventeenth-century history. Central European coun- tries like Bohemia, Poland, Hungary and Transylvania are at worst ignored, at best given a modest nook. This is not at all in keeping with the image the Calvinists in

1992. G. VERHOEVEN, Devotie en negotie. Delft als bedevaartsplaats in de late middeleeuwen. VU Uitgeverij, Amsterdam 1992. MANFRED P. FLEISCHER (ed.), The harvest of humanism in Central Europe: essays in honor of Lewis W Spitz. Concordia Publishing House, St. Louis 1992. J.P. DE VALK (samenst

Janis Kreslins

have included. Significant parts of Western and Central Europe remain untouched and would have deserved similar mention. One also has to raise the question whether it is possible to dis- cuss the Early Modern Period using present day geographies. The result of such a path is that territories important

Yudha Thianto

claims to be comprehensive, it nonetheless leaves large geographical terri- tories outside of its scope. In her introduction, Larissa Taylor describes what a chapter on Spain could have included. Significant parts of Western and Central Europe remain untouched and would have deserved similar mention. One

M.E.H.N. Mout

from this moot point one cannot but admire Hotson's convincing analysis of Alsted's thought in which humanism, hermeticism and Calvinism were mixed. The author is at pains to point out that such a "mixture of cultural ingredients" (229) was by no means a bizarre anomaly in seven- teenth-century Central

C. Augustijn

author is at pains to point out that such a "mixture of cultural ingredients" (229) was by no means a bizarre anomaly in seven- teenth-century Central European Calvinism. When Alsted in 1629 decided to leave Herborn and accepted the invitation to the recently founded Calvinist academy in Gyulafehérvár in