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Waters of the Exodus

Jewish Experiences with Water in Ptolemaic and Roman Egypt

Serie:

Nathalie LaCoste

In Waters of the Exodus, Nathalie LaCoste examines the Diasporic Jewish community in Ptolemaic and Roman Egypt and their relationship to the hydric environment. By focusing on four retellings of the exodus narrative composed by Egyptian Jews—Artapanus, Ezekiel the Tragedian, Wisdom of Solomon, and Philo of Alexandria—she lays out how the hydric environment of Egypt, and specifically the Nile river, shaped the transmission of the exodus story. Mapping these observations onto the physical landscape of Egypt provides a new perspective on the formation of Jewish communities in Egypt.

Serie:

Nathalie LaCoste

of Religion 9.2 (1997): 111–26. 37 Horden and Purcell, The Corrupting Sea , 45. 38 Veronica Strang, The Meaning of Water (Oxford: Berg, 2004), 5: “Human-environmental relations are also subject to ecological constraints and physiological and biological needs. As the substance that is literally

Serie:

Nathalie LaCoste

ideas presented here are twofold; Osiris as the god of the dead (and the afterlife) was linked to water in the sense of purification and preparation of the deceased for the afterlife. For more on this subject, see Centrone, “This is the Form,” 357; J. Gwyn Griffiths, The Origins of Osiris and his Cult

Carleen Mandolfo

violence might better be heralded as a fundamental qualifier of their femininity. In short, biblical scholars need to pay more attention to violent women characters as feminist subjects. Further, they need to consider violence as a means of enabling women rather than the disabling that has occurred through

Biblical Interpretation

A Journal of Contemporary Approaches

Chefredakteur Tat-siong Benny Liew

This innovative and highly acclaimed journal publishes articles on various aspects of critical biblical scholarship in a complex global context. The journal provides a medium for the development and exercise of a whole range of current interpretive trajectories, as well as deliberation and appraisal of methodological foci and resources. Alongside individual essays on various subjects submitted by authors, the journal welcomes proposals for special issues that focus on particular emergent themes and analytical trends.

Over the past two decades, Biblical Interpretation has provided a professional forum for pushing the disciplinary boundaries of biblical studies: not only in terms of what biblical texts mean, but also what questions to ask of biblical texts, as well as what resources to use in reading biblical literature. The journal has thus the distinction of serving as a site for theoretical reflection and methodological experimentation.

Biblical Interpretation accepts submission for review on a continuous basis.

To submit a proposal for a special issue, please contact the Executive Editor Tat-siong Benny Liew, bliew@holycross.edu
Suggestions for Special Issues could be ´Songs of Praise´ / The Bible and Pop Music BI XIX - 2 or ´Jesus in Cultural Complexity BI XVIII / 4-5

Online submission: Articles for publication in Biblical Interpretation can be submitted online through Editorial Manager, please click here.

Need support prior to submitting your manuscript? Make the process of preparing and submitting a manuscript easier with Brill's suite of author services, an online platform that connects academics seeking support for their work with specialized experts who can help.

Saul M. Olyan

in the formulation about how the law might be enforced, yet at the same time, there is no indication that there are circumstances in which the law could ever be subject to modification or suspension. Instead of focusing on Sabbath rest for working animals, slaves, and resident aliens (Exod. 23

Daniel J. D. Stulac

-who-rise-early” (v. 11a) to “pursue beer” (v.11b). Williamson observes that v. 11b (“beer they pursue”) and v. 11d (“wine emblazes them”) appear similar in that each colon names the alcoholic beverage before the verb. At the same time, they are syntactically different in that the verb’s subject switches from the

Laura Carlson Hasler

outweighs the desire to effect a tidy and contiguous story. Documents are subject to collection in Ezra-Nehemiah, yet documents here do not ensure truth. Before jumping to claims that documents either made a story more vivid or believable to its ancient audience or that their disruptive quality underscores

Sébastien Doane and Nathan Robert Mastnjak

, appears plausibly explained by the presence of her monument in the landscape and the proximity of this monument to a significant waypoint for those subjected to forced migration. 16 The development of this image in the following verses is significant. Rachel’s mourning is immediately followed with a

Emily O. Gravett

fascinated by the enigmatic, the unknown. If female biblical characters are never permitted to fully emerge in post-biblical interpretations, they can remain perpetually mysterious, subject to whatever we may wish to project onto them. If these women retain their mystery – that is, if we avoid making