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As a token of their gratitude and recognition of the significant work of Karen Yuzbashyan (1927–2009), his friends, disciples, and former colleagues dedicate the present collection of twenty-five contributions to the memory of this great Armenian scholar. The volume focuses on research pertinent to

in Armenia between Byzantium and the Orient

, until early dawn, showing me its little known by-ways, as he later would do for me in Erevan. He showed me his “datcha” at the Finnish frontier and obtained for me permission to go as far as Novgorod the Great and to present my own work to the Oriental Institute. At the same time, he pursued both his

in Armenia between Byzantium and the Orient

languages. 4 In this context, the aim of the present volume is to sample the various aspects of the transmission of translated patristic works (broadly conceived) in Late Antiquity and beyond, being meant as a propaedeutical and exploratory step for a corpus-based versional project over the following years

in Caught in Translation: Studies on Versions of Late-Antique Christian Literature

was compiled; (4), it can also give us a better understanding of the Sogdian version and of the practices of translating Patristic texts from Syriac to Sogdian, and finally, (5) it can elucidate some of the obscure Sogdian words used by the translator(s). For the present paper, I will mainly focus on

in Caught in Translation: Studies on Versions of Late-Antique Christian Literature

, introducing and securing basic ideas of Christian cosmology. The textual relationships and dependencies within the Šestodnev and its (not always consistent) worldview sadly remain understudied, in spite of its great resonance in the Slavia orthodoxa . The present article will not focus on the early

in Caught in Translation: Studies on Versions of Late-Antique Christian Literature

spices, their traditional association with either heat or coldness, 9 as well as their appearance in scripture. Firstly, henna and nard are presented by Gregory as a good combination of warmth and fragrance. 10 Next, as saffron is neither very hot nor very cold Gregory associates it with virtue as the

in Caught in Translation: Studies on Versions of Late-Antique Christian Literature

window frame of the Cathedral in Ishkhan, at the lintel of the Small Chapel in Ishkhan, at the frame of the eastern window, and in the clothing ornament presented as a part of the Deisis scene on the southern wall of the church at Oshk. The pattern of ornamentation with interwoven frames has undergone

in Armenia between Byzantium and the Orient

, on folios 651 vb –653 vb ; the complete manuscript comprises a total of 655 folios. 2 The text is written in nuskhuri script and is presented in two columns per manuscript page. 3 The hand that copied the text has been dated to between the tenth and early twelfth centuries, with a reasonable

in Armenia between Byzantium and the Orient

his theological thought, and led to the creation of many commentaries on his works. Studies of Greek commentaries on Nazianzen’s writings require researchers to discover and study appropriate Greek manuscripts. At present, this task still remains unfinished, because of the large amount of available

in Armenia between Byzantium and the Orient

disappear. The purpose of this article and of the presentation of an updated edition and translation of the letters, is neither to present a new solution to these problems of the text, nor to throw support to one interpretation or another. Rather, its purpose is to lay out the available textual evidence for

in Armenia between Byzantium and the Orient