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This book examines a widespread, and often misunderstood, doctrine within the medieval Aristotelian tradition, namely the inclusion of Aristotle's Rhetoric and Poetics within the scope of the Organon. It studies this doctrine, as presented by the Islamic philosophers Al- Fārābī, Avicenna, and Averroes, from a purely philosophical perspective, and argues that the logical construal of the arts of rhetoric and poetics is both interesting and illuminating.
The book begins by examining some prevalent misconceptions regarding the logical interpretation of the Rhetoric and Poetics. Chapter two considers the Greek background of the doctrine, first through an examination of the Aristotelian divisions of the sciences, and then through an examination of the beginnings of the logical classification of the Rhetoric and Poetics among the Greek commentators from the school of Alexandria. The remainder of the work is devoted to a detailed consideration of the Arabic philosophers' development of the doctrine, both their understanding of its general epistemological and logical underpinnings, and their elaboration of the specific logical structures upon which poetical and rhetorical discourse is based. Consideration is also given to the relationship between contemporary philosophical views of rhetoric and poetics, and the views of these medieval authors.

than taking a purely textual perspective, and explicitly stated that the people should be allowed to choose whatever they see fit in their governance. This appeal notes an essential transformation in the movement from an ideological dogmatic movement, which views reality in terms of absolutist black

in Journal of Islamic Ethics

that the Indigenous psychology movement has grown (for example see Marsella, 2013)— All Psychology is Indigenous Psychology i.e. Latino/a Psychology, Asian Psychology, Native America Psychology, Black Psychology, Western Psychology, American Psychology etc.). This raises the question, what would

in Journal of Islamic Ethics

du philosophe et du médecin Ibn Ṭumlūs , iii, n. 3. 56 See, Deborah L. Black, Logic and Aristotle’s “Rhetoric” and “Poetics” in Medieval Arabic Philosophy (Leiden-New York-Cologne: E.J. Brill, 1990), 247; A. Hasnawi writes: “In fact […] the inclusion of the Rhetoric and the Poetics was in the

in Ibn Ṭumlūs (Alhagiag Bin Thalmus d. 620/1223), Compendium on Logic al-Muḫtaṣar fī al-manṭiq

SIEPM Freiburg (Germany) August 20–23, 2014, ed. Nadja Germann and Steven Harvey. 44 ‮صار هذا معروفا بين الدارسين. ويمكن العودة إلى الدراسة الجيدة والرائدة:‬‎ Deborah L. Black, Logic and Aristotle’s “Rhetoric” and “Poetics” in Medieval Arabic Philosophy (Leiden-New York-Cologne: E.J. Brill, 1990). 45

in Ibn Ṭumlūs (Alhagiag Bin Thalmus d. 620/1223), Compendium on Logic al-Muḫtaṣar fī al-manṭiq

shadow to the remoteness it has from its subject. He mentions in this very chapter that mountains seem black and the Sun the size of a shield when viewed from afar; this lack of color and accuracy is due to distance ( buʿd ). But he maintains that the shadow is still ineluctably linked to its subject and

in Knowing God: Ibn ʿArabī and ʿAbd al-Razzāq al-Qāshānī’s Metaphysics of the Divine

piety minded opposition, foremost amongst whom were the Alids. 53 Abū Muslim and his army swept westward carrying black banners probably as a sign of mourning for the death of various members of the Prophet’s family, killed at the hands of the Umayyads. Abū Muslim was a brilliant statesman and general

in Sainthood and Authority in Early Islam: Al-Ḥakīm al-Tirmidhī’s Theory of wilāya and the Reenvisioning of the Sunnī Caliphate

opposites’ (ἐναντιότητας), such as the limited and the unlimited, and “chance opposites,” such as white and black, and large and small. 395 This runs counter to the conclusion of Hikmet Yaman, who considers ḥikma to be of primarily Islamic origin. The difference in my approach is that I have focused not

in Sainthood and Authority in Early Islam: Al-Ḥakīm al-Tirmidhī’s Theory of wilāya and the Reenvisioning of the Sunnī Caliphate

Sherman A. Jackson, Islam and the Problem of Black Suffering , 102. 433 Schacht discusses an early Murjiʾī text Al-ʿālim wa l-mutaʿallim attributed to Abū Ḥanīfa through the riwāya of Abū Muqātil al-Samarqandī (d. 208/823) although Schacht argues that Abū Muqātil was the original author of the text

in Sainthood and Authority in Early Islam: Al-Ḥakīm al-Tirmidhī’s Theory of wilāya and the Reenvisioning of the Sunnī Caliphate

nevertheless adhering firmly to his linguistic principles and avoiding recourse to purely rational considerations. A simple example is the following ḥadīth , reported on the authority of Ibn ʿAbbās: “The Black Stone is the right hand of God on earth; whoever shakes it and kisses it, it is as if he had shaken

in Ibn Taymiyya on Reason and Revelation