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As of 1 January 2020 this journal is no longer distributed by Brill. For information about subscriptions, please contact Higher Education Press.

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The China Law and Society Review provides state-of-the-art review articles on research about the development and functioning of law and legal institutions in China. It focuses on reviewing interdisciplinary socio-legal research that analyses law in action in China. It publishes commissioned articles by leading senior scholars as well as emerging talent from across the globe. First issues will center on legal institutions, such as the courts, legal profession, legislators, prosecutors, the media, the party, and civil society organizations. Later issues will look in more depth at the development and functioning of substantive areas of law, including tort, labor, environment, intellectual property, criminal, and corporate law. In each issue cross-cutting themes will emerge which are likely to include legal consciousness, access to justice, rule of law, enforcement and compliance, regulatory strategies, law and development, ethics and corruption, judicial independence, central-local relations, and formal and informal institutions. Where deemed interesting, publications are to position the literature on China in a broader comparative context, in order to analyze China’s special characteristics as well as draw out theoretical significance. In the course of its publication the Review will establish a comprehensive and authoritative account of Law and Society in China. By updating the electronically published articles on set intervals, the timeliness of the reviews will be ensured. The Review will be of interest to scholars of Chinese law, Chinese politics and governance, Chinese business, as well as Chinese society. Moreover it will be of interest to public and private practitioners seeking to understand how to deal with law and legal institutions in the Chinese context.

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The dictionary online includes two sets: one in traditional Chinese with English and French translations and the other in simplified Chinese with English and French translations. The print edition of the dictionary in traditional Chinese and simplified Chinese respectively will be published in 2019.

The Ricci Dictionary of Chinese Law ( Chinese-English, French), developed by the Ricci Association since 2006, is the very first trilingual dictionary on Chinese law. The dictionary includes approximately 24,000 legal terms in Chinese (legal terms per se as well as terms which are often used in a legal context), as well as English and French translations of these terms. A team of around 40 French, Chinese and English-speaking lawyers, scholars, law students and proofreaders contributed to the dictionary under the supervision and guidance of the Ricci Association.

The dictionary focuses on "Chinese law," i.e. legal terms used by legal professionals working on Chinese legal documents. In the minds of the editors of the dictionary, law includes "actual" law (i.e., instruments and decisions of governmental authorities and courts which are legally enforceable against anyone falling in their scope), "past" law (i.e., laws that were "actual" some time ago but are not anymore) as well as law as a subject of theoretical discussion and an academic discipline. The dictionary includes 20 branches, including Ancient Law, Administrative Law, Admiralty Law, Banking and Financial Law, Civil Law, Commercial Law, Company Law, Constitutional Law, Criminal Law, Environmental Law, Institutions, Insurance Law, International Private Law, International Public Law, International Trade Law, IP Law, Jurisprudence, Labour Law, Procedure, and Tax Law. The terms included in the branches of international element (e.g., International Private Law, International Public Law and International Trade Law) can generally be characterized as relating to actual law or law as an academic discipline.

The dictionary would be invaluable to:
- lawyers in English and French speaking countries working with/on PRC (People’s Republic of China) legal documents in Chinese;
- Chinese lawyers and Chinese students;
- professional translators;
- academics working with PRC legal documents in Chinese in the fields of Chinese studies, legal studies and comparative social science studies;
- students outside China studying PRC legal documents; and
- journalists commenting on Chinese legal issues.
Auteur : Xin He

* The Author is grateful for the financial support of GRF projects (CityU 142013 and CityU 11403114) of the RGC in Hong Kong. Sue Trevaskes provides insightful comments for an earlier version of this article. Introduction Chinese courts handle millions of cases annually and from time to

in China Law and Society Review

1 Introduction and Overview This critique assesses each of the dispositive findings on jurisdiction and merits in the Award of South China Sea Arbitration, 1 from the perspective of the applicable substantive and procedural rules of public international law. This critique does not address

in Asian Yearbook of International Law, Volume 24 (2018)
Rédacteurs en chef Ken Oliphant, Zhang Pinghua, and Chen Lei
This book aims to investigate the way in which personality rights are protected in China through a comparative and cross-cultural lens drawing on perspectives from Europe and elsewhere in the world. Currently, the question whether or not to incorporate a special law on personal rights – the right to life, the right to health, and the rights to reputation and privacy – into a future Chinese Civil Code is heatedly debated in the Chinese legal community. The essential topics that are addressed in this book include general issues of personality rights, personality rights in Constitutional law, personality rights in private law, the legislative development of personality rights in China, case studies of the right to privacy, personality rights in the mass media and the internet, competition law aspects of the right of publicity, the protection of patients’ personal information, and personality rights in the family context. The book offers a broad investigation of personality rights protection in both China and Europe and provides the first substantive comparison of the Chinese and European regimes. The project is conceived as a joint effort on the part of a carefully chosen team of Chinese and European academics, working closely together. The team consists of both senior scholars and young researchers led by well-known experts in the field of comparative tort law.
Auteur : William Jing Guo

* Attorney at law in the Netherlands, PhD (University of Amsterdam), Magister Juris (University of Oxford), w.guo@houthoff.com. Since 1949, when the People’s Republic of China was founded, cases have not constituted a source of law in China. 1 Neither in theory nor in practice do judicial

in China Law and Society Review
Auteur : Ethan Michelson

1 Introduction Ever since the word weiquan 维权 blazed into English-language discourse on the Chinese legal system in the mid-2000s, it has been associated with activism. In English-language accounts, weiquan is often used interchangeably with its literal translation, “protecting rights

in China Law and Society Review
Auteur : Francis Snyder
This book is the first major study of the making of transnational food safety law in China. Francis Snyder shows how the 2008 melamine infant formula crisis led to China’s first food safety law and new food safety standards, substantial reforms in government policy and closer relations with international organisations. He also identifies current and future challenges and makes recommendations for dealing with them.
Chinese food safety law today is influenced strongly by cross-border factors. While transnational regimes help to shape domestic decisions, many institutions deeply embedded in Chinese society have played key roles in this transformation. Francis Snyder emphasises that, in finding its own path toward ensuring food safety, China can both learn from and teach other countries.
In May 2017 this title has been awarded a 'Gourmand World Cookbook Award' in Yantai, Shandong Province, China: 'Best in the World' in two categories: 'Best Wine Law Book' and 'Food Safety Institutions'.