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Author: Brian Duffy

fullness of life. The view of the ocean through the floor-to-ceiling windows of his house is a reminder of his living now at the edge of the earth and, as he waits to find out if his treatment is working, at the edge of life. Yet this proximity to death brings a new clarity, an absoluteness and a sense

In: Morality, Identity and Narrative in the Fiction of Richard Ford

noting how it connects to the music of their life. By using this approach, students can read the words of a living artist and discover how Knight once ago, and not too long ago, read and connected to The Grapes of Wrath. In this text, they can read the interview with the songwriter (first published

In: The Grapes of Wrath (2 vols.)

eat, how fast or slow they drive. When Grampa dies (significantly, in the Wilsons’ makeshift tent), the novel suggests that the ability to shift the center of life and activity and to adjust to a space predicated on constant movement—movement motivated by necessity and fear rather than by desire

In: The Grapes of Wrath (2 vols.)
Author: J. Bakker

brutality. The intensity with which Hemingway conceived Harry Morgan may have given him larger-than-life-size dimensions. but the challenge which could have motivated this giant meaningfully was lacking, and so Hemingway failed to humanize him. Morgan's response to violence and death remained violence

In: Fiction as Survival Strategy

A Shared Poetic: The Influence of Ricketts’s Literary Philosophy on Steinbeck’s The Grapes of Wrath Katharine A. Rodger University of California, Davis Edward F. Ricketts often used the term “unified field hypothesis” to describe his personal philosophy about life and the

In: The Grapes of Wrath (2 vols.)
Author: J. Bakker

birth and death, is conveyed by implication in a few flat statements: "Nick did not watch. His curiosity had been gone for a long time." What has gone is his curiosity for the life-destroying violence he inadvertently witnessed. What has remained, what has increased, is his life-enhancing sensation

In: Fiction as Survival Strategy

language and praise, Henry's criticism of Stevens seems motivated by jealousy and mean-spiritedness. His reading of Stevens is a bit idiosyncratic in that he sees the poet as one who celebrates life, possibly from the sentiments in "Sunday Morning," and somehow this is not acknowledging how painful

In: Berryman's Henry
Author: Alec Gilmore

living on the margins, and it is difficult to see how anyone sensitive enough to reflect life on Tortilla Flat and Cannery Row, not to mention In Dubious Battle, Of Mice and Men, The Pastures of Heaven and especially the story of Tularecito, could suddenly turn up with a Cathy and expect to be taken

In: East of Eden

they represent a truer vision of life than we suppose? Nowhere is the dilemma more apparent than in three novels of John Barth dealing with history and myth. Beginning with The Sot WeedFactor, and culminating in Giles Goat Boy and Chimera, fantasy serves not only as an essential instrument for

In: American Literature in Belgium
Author: Brian Duffy

second strand of the story – a theme of the narrative. When the narrator sees Mack in the station concourse he is motivated to go to speak to him by an impulse to experience “a dimensionless, unreverberant moment”. He understands this impulse as no more than a desire to benefit from a fleeting

In: Morality, Identity and Narrative in the Fiction of Richard Ford